Cancer patients, survivors find truth in ’50/50′ | LA Times

In the new film “50/50,” there is a scene where cancer patient Adam, played by Joseph Gordon-Levitt, is on a gurney being wheeled into the operating room with his parents by his side. As the nurses take the 27-year-old away, he calls out for his mom like he’s a little boy. It’s an affecting moment, but for Matthew Zachary, it was particularly personal.

“That’s exactly what happened to me,” said the 37-year-old father of twins from New York City who was diagnosed withbrain cancer at age 21. “Literally I’m with my parents and they are wheeling me off to the operating room and I lost it. It was a horrible, horrible experience.”

For Heidi Adams, it was the scene at the dinner table between Gordon-Levitt’s character and his mother, played by Anjelica Huston, who wants to move in to help care for him.

“I remember that conversation with my mother, that struggle at that time in your life when you are discovering your independence, fighting for your independence and you are thrown back into this position where you need to rely on people, where you need your mom. It’s very disorienting,” said Adams, 44, from Austin, Texas, who lived with her parents for 2 1/2 years when [...] continue the story

What GPs can learn by listening to patients | The Gaurdian

I was nervous at first and wasn’t sure what to expect. I write this having just come back from our first patient participation group (PPG) meeting. After this inaugural face-to-face, I came home feeling that the disparate group of our patients who made an effort to give up their time were generally pleased that they had attended.

I was really glad to meet them all outside the consulting room yet still on practice turf, managing to listen to their views. And in return I gave them some insight into the workings of their local surgery as well as a whistlestop tour.

Every patient who attended had two things in common – health needs and being registered at our practice. It’s only right that they get to voice their opinions, and that we as a practice can adapt to their needs and provide them with an even better service.

The government has encouraged practices to form such groups as part of a DES, or directed enhanced service. These are – in theory – optional initiatives which reward practices in return for work that improves the quality of patient care.

The themes which came up were no surprise. Access featured heavily. What is the best way [...] continue the story