Patient Commando attends Health Council of Canada’s National Symposium on Patient Engagement

During the Health Council of Canada Symposium on Patient Engagement Daniel Stolfi, star of Cancer Can’t Dance Like This, disclosed that his tipping point to becoming an engaged patient, came when he was being over medicated in error and suffering bad side effects but no healthcare providers were listening.

Healthcare leaders across the country came together to learn how to improve patient engagement and increase safety and improve outcomes at the Allstream centre in Toronto.

Daniel presented his patient story to inform the system on how to improve communications between doctors and patients and increase the state of collaboration. His presentation was funny, deeply personal and moving. The crowd was animated and laughing.

A report of the symposium is promised to be released this winter.

Be sure to sign up for Patient Commando’s newsletter for updates and to receive a free copy of our white paper:  On a New Frontier of Patient Engagement.

Patient Commando’s reaction to the movie “50/50”

Thanks to Entertainment One Group, Patient Commando received several passes to their latest release 50/50.

We quickly offered the passes through Facebook and Twitter until they were all gone. Yesterday we received the following from fellow Patient Commando, Sean McDermott on his reaction to the film: Today, my daughter Kate and I went to see the movie 50/50. It features a lot of laughter and a heap of Seth Rogans colourful language and pot smoking ways, if you like that…and we did. The movie is a poignant examination of the manner in which family and friends react to chronic/terminal illness. Sometimes I wonder how Kate copes with all this challenge of me, her Dad having an endstage disease On the way out I was thinking how many moments I could relate to, and Kate said to me “that was a good movie for you and I to see together”. I smiled and was grateful for her love and support.” Thank you again to Entertainment One for the opportunity to share this film with our community.

Social Media & Patient Centric Care

Michael Evans, Director and Staff Physician at St. Michael’s Hospital talks about social media and patient-centred care. This interview was conducted by The Change Foundation during their Meeting of the Minds 2011 Conference: How to ACE the Patient Experience. The Change Foundation is an independent policy think tank, intent on changing the health-care debate, health-care practice and the health-care experience in Ontario.

Video is also available on the Change Foundation website here.

Cancer patients, survivors find truth in ’50/50′ | LA Times

In the new film “50/50,” there is a scene where cancer patient Adam, played by Joseph Gordon-Levitt, is on a gurney being wheeled into the operating room with his parents by his side. As the nurses take the 27-year-old away, he calls out for his mom like he’s a little boy. It’s an affecting moment, but for Matthew Zachary, it was particularly personal.

“That’s exactly what happened to me,” said the 37-year-old father of twins from New York City who was diagnosed withbrain cancer at age 21. “Literally I’m with my parents and they are wheeling me off to the operating room and I lost it. It was a horrible, horrible experience.”

For Heidi Adams, it was the scene at the dinner table between Gordon-Levitt’s character and his mother, played by Anjelica Huston, who wants to move in to help care for him.

“I remember that conversation with my mother, that struggle at that time in your life when you are discovering your independence, fighting for your independence and you are thrown back into this position where you need to rely on people, where you need your mom. It’s very disorienting,” said Adams, 44, from Austin, Texas, who lived with her parents for 2 1/2 years when [...] continue the story

What GPs can learn by listening to patients | The Gaurdian

I was nervous at first and wasn’t sure what to expect. I write this having just come back from our first patient participation group (PPG) meeting. After this inaugural face-to-face, I came home feeling that the disparate group of our patients who made an effort to give up their time were generally pleased that they had attended.

I was really glad to meet them all outside the consulting room yet still on practice turf, managing to listen to their views. And in return I gave them some insight into the workings of their local surgery as well as a whistlestop tour.

Every patient who attended had two things in common – health needs and being registered at our practice. It’s only right that they get to voice their opinions, and that we as a practice can adapt to their needs and provide them with an even better service.

The government has encouraged practices to form such groups as part of a DES, or directed enhanced service. These are – in theory – optional initiatives which reward practices in return for work that improves the quality of patient care.

The themes which came up were no surprise. Access featured heavily. What is the best way [...] continue the story