Hypertension success stories boost BP control | TheHeart.org

The first randomized controlled trial to examine the effect of a culturally appropriate storytelling intervention on control of blood pressure has shown some success, with those who were uncontrolled at baseline improving systolic BP by 11 mm Hg over the course of the study, published in the January 18, 2011 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine [1].

Dr Thomas K Houston (University of Massachusetts, Worcester) and colleagues created DVDs of real African American patients from a low-income, inner-city setting telling their own stories of how they battled hypertension [2]. They showed these to half of the people in their study, while the remainder saw a “control” DVD that covered health topics not related to hypertension. The BP reductions seen, particularly in those with uncontrolled hypertension at baseline, are “similar” to those achieved with pharmaceutical interventions and dietary approaches, say Houston et al.

“I do think that storytelling is innately human. It’s a way we make meaning out of the world and understand our lives,” Houston told heartwire. “So it does apply across the board, it has value for everyone, although there is evidence that the benefit is greater for those of lower literacy.” I do think that storytelling is innately human. It’s a [...] continue the story

The Best Medicine? | Metro News

Patient Commando gets the blood pumping with a big dose of its laughter therapy program. The non-profit group helps support those with chronic disease, in severe pain.

They’re not sick jokes, but rather jokes for the sick.

A new, non-profit company called Patient Commando is making sure that stories about health struggles — both sad and funny — get told and listened to. Laughter therapy has long been known as a powerful tool to release tension and get the blood pumping more efficiently.

In Patient Commando’s promotional video, a comedic actor spoofs everyone’s worst hospital nightmare.

Donning his hat, socks and shoes, he tries to make a dignified exit, but his hospital gown isn’t done up and his bare bum jiggles hilariously for all to see.

Comic relief — through laugh therapy and live theatre shows — is one of the ways that Patient Commando helps support people who have chronic disease, terminal disease or are suffering from bereavement.

The company also encourages people to tell their stories. “I’m interested in the expression of the story,” says Toronto founder of Patient Commando Zal Press.

“Listen to the patient voice.”

Press himself has struggled with the painful symptoms of Crohn’s disease, an inflammation of the intestines, for 30 years. “It feels [...] continue the story

Partnering with patients to improve care | HIROC News

Several recent news items point to an interest in Canadian healthcare providers partnering with patients to heighten patient safety and healthcare.

Rather than providers positioning as the experts dictating interventions, some are looking to patients for their perspective on their own care and the larger system.

At the Saskatoon Health Region, senior managers are conducting weekly walkarounds where they engage front-line staff, patients and their families in dialogue about patient-safety issues.

The goal is to heighten the culture of safety through a conversation identifying issues and solutions, and it’s working, says vice-president of clinical and operation support services Sandra Blevins.

“We have quite lively discussions around care aspects, and educate patients about their role in patient safety.

“The culture shift is starting to happen,” she adds.

On June 20, Barbara Balik, a senior faculty member at the Institute for Health Information and CEO of Common Fire Healthcare Consulting, delivers a keynote in Toronto on the importance of partnering with patients and families.

In an earlier interview with Axiom News, Balik highlighted the value of those partnerships in light of the Excellent Care for All Act, noting they can contribute to a better designed system for effective cross-continuum care.

“If we partner with patients and families on very (aspect of [...] continue the story

Patient Commando Speaks to The Ottawa Hospital

Three times a year The Ottawa Hospital (TOH) and Leadership Development Institute (LDI) bring together approximately 450 executives, directors, managers, supervisors and physician department and division heads.  Each of these gatherings provide leaders with inspiration, information, and skill building, centred on fostering a culture aimed at achieving top 10% in quality and patient safety in North America.

Central to this mission is the patient and family experience. Patients communicate directly with leaders about what matters to them and how leaders and front line care providers can make a difference.  This is complemented with practical skills and tools that leaders can apply in practice.

Two weeks ago TOH hosted one of their triannual leadership events.  We were honoured to see Zal Press, Executive Director of Patient Commando invited to present: Patient Engagement in the Journey – A Patient’s Perspective

A Donation to SickKids Foundation

On May 12, Cancer Can’t Dance Like This, presented by Patient Commando, played to a sold out audience at CBC’s Glenn Gould Studio in Toronto.

The evening’s production was hosted for Lilah’s Fund – a fund that supports research into neuroblastoma, a cancer that mainly affects children under 5 years of age.

Last week the star of the Cancer Can’t Dance Like This, Daniel Stolfi and Patient Commando’s Executive Director Zal Press, gave a significant donation to SickKids Foundation on behalf of Lilah’s Fund.  A $5,000 check was presented to Dr. David Kaplan, Senior Scientist and head of Cancer Research at The Hospital for Sick Children.

Our sincere thanks to all of those who came out and supported our inaugural event.  We look forward to hosting many more productions and continuing our work in patient storytelling and education.

For information on Patient Commando feature presentations, speakers bureau and workshops please email info@patientcommando.com