Kathy Kastner: Thinking, Talking, Asking

Our good friend Kathy Kastner over at Ability4life.com has been trying to make sense out of doctor/patient communication for a long time. How often do people not take medication properly because they don’t understand the instructions? How often do patients simply forget what a doctor has said because they can’t listen as fast as a doctor can talk? Imagine how important sensitivity to communications needs to be when a highly educated doctor speaks to adults with 8th grade literacy, or immigrants with limited English, or seniors with failing memories, or teenagers with bursting libidos. Kathy’s been busy producing a series of videos and she describes the objectives in her own words: In between doctor’s appointments, we patients live our lives, and a ‘one size fits all’ rarely applies to daily health regimes. It’s in our own best interest to ensure we’ve negotiated a schedule we can follow. With my ‘think about it, talk about it, ask about it’ campaign I use real life examples to help kick start that process.

View Kathy’s Youtube Channel here http://www.youtube.com/user/kathykastner

Patient Commando & CYCLE4:National Relay

Toronto native and Queen’s University English major Aryssah Stankevitsch has a big goal.

“Two years ago at age nineteen I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Since then, I have immersed myself in anything I could to raise awareness and funds for juvenile diabetes research. My main inspiration in life is to find a cure; when that day comes, I want to know that I was part of it and contributed. I’m prepared to bike, crawl, cart wheel across the country to do so”.

And on August 13, Aryssah did just that.  As a member of the CYCLE4:National Relay team, she kick started a journey across Canada, a distance of almost 7000 kilometres. Aryssah and the other CYCLE4:National Relay team members will be riding in pairs, symbolizing that great things are always accomplished in ‘tandem’ with others. The relay will wind up in the seaside town of Digby, Nova Scotia on Sunday September 4, 2011 welcomed by 50,000 people as part of the Wharf Rat Rally.

The CYCLE4:National Relay in its inaugural year as the legacy of Cyclebetes and Team H2V – both national cycling relays that began in September 2007. As a banner program of CYCLE4:Whatmatters, the National Relay allows all riders to raise funds to support the health issues and organizations that matter most [...] continue the story

A Donation to SickKids Foundation

On May 12, Cancer Can’t Dance Like This, presented by Patient Commando, played to a sold out audience at CBC’s Glenn Gould Studio in Toronto.

The evening’s production was hosted for Lilah’s Fund – a fund that supports research into neuroblastoma, a cancer that mainly affects children under 5 years of age.

Last week the star of the Cancer Can’t Dance Like This, Daniel Stolfi and Patient Commando’s Executive Director Zal Press, gave a significant donation to SickKids Foundation on behalf of Lilah’s Fund.  A $5,000 check was presented to Dr. David Kaplan, Senior Scientist and head of Cancer Research at The Hospital for Sick Children.

Our sincere thanks to all of those who came out and supported our inaugural event.  We look forward to hosting many more productions and continuing our work in patient storytelling and education.

For information on Patient Commando feature presentations, speakers bureau and workshops please email info@patientcommando.com

Birth of a New Patient Movement

How do patient advocacy groups get started? What motivates people to get engaged and involved? How do they become enabled and empowered?

A milestone event was held on July 20th, 2013 in Toronto to highlight the plight of women suffering from uterine fibroids and the associated heavy menstrual bleeding.

Women from across Canada who suffer from uterine fibroids came together to meet, share and brainstorm to create the first authentic patient voice in Canada regarding this important area of women’s health.

The significance of this event lies in the impact of this condition on the whole patient experience from living with the disease, diagnosis, treatment to follow up. Uterine fibroids account for more hysterectomies in Canada than any other condition. According to the National Uterine Fibroids Foundation (NUFF) in the U.S., up to 80 percent of all women have uterine fibroids. While the majority never have symptoms, one in four ends up with symptoms severe enough to require treatment and the experience can be horrifying.

In Canada, there is no organization such as NUFF, no unified or organized patient voice, to advocate for timely and appropriate care and treatment of women who have suffered unbelievable pain, discomfort, embarrassment, humiliation and anger due to uterine [...] continue the story