Tattoo Therapy

By Anne Marie Cerato

There are a few words I thought I’d never utter together, Tattoos and Therapy are an example, mind you “I have cancer” is another! You might wonder how inflicting pain on one’s self could be seen as therapeutic, but I swear to you it is. The pain is temporary, what stays behind is a permanent reminder, much like a scar. Before actually getting tattooed, I did try conventional therapy, it worked for a while, but was somewhat unsatisfying, but I’m jumping the gun!! We really should start at the beginning.

My name is Anne Marie and I am living with stage 4 Lung Cancer, my story starts in 2009 when I was diagnosed with stage 3a Adenocarcinoma of the right lung. This was a shocker because at the time I was a healthy 30 year old that had never smoked!! I received treatment almost immediately (Chemo-radiation, surgery followed by high dose chemo); six months later I was done. All this seemed to have worked until 2011 when it was determined that like the cat, the cancer came back. This time, it was in both lungs and in multiple lobes and my options were far fewer, so how did [...] continue the story

Improv at Daybreak

“Making known the gifts of people with intellectual disabilities.”  Improv is a unique tool to deepen the rich relationship between patient and provider. It aids in the challenge that professional and support staff face to relate to patients and caregivers as individuals, and in this case, as fellow artists.

‘Improv at Daybreak’ provides a glimpse into the Monday morning Drama program at L’Arche Daybreak, an inclusive community for adults with intellectual disabilities in Richmond Hill, Ontario. The film features interviews with core members and assistants, and snippets of all of them having boatloads of fun together as they improvise their way through theatre games. Improv teacher Brian G. Smith shares with the group his experience as a member of Toronto’s famous ‘The Second City’ comedy theatre.

West Nile Virus

Don Read, M.D. discusses the dangers of West Nile Virus infection, prevention, and aerial spraying for mosquitoes with Dr. Dan McCoy from the Dallas County Medical Society.

The Moth Presents Amy Cohen: Fighting Chance

“I do not feel unfortunate.”

Confronting an overwhelming genetic predisposition for breast cancer, a comedy writer makes the ultimate choice.

Amy Cohen is the author of The New York Times best-seller The Late Bloomer’s Revolution. She’s been both a writer and producer for the sitcoms Caroline in the City and Spin City, wrote a dating column for the New York Observer, and was the dating correspondent for cable TV’s New York Central. Amy lives in New York City.

Nurses Grieve Too: Insights into Experiences with Perinatal Loss

This ground-breaking documentary shares what grief is for nurses who care for bereaved families with perinatal loss. This research-based documentary answers the research question: What is the experience of grieving, for obstetrical and neonatal nurses caring for families who experience perinatal loss? Nurses describe the professional and personal impact of grieving, what helps them and how the experience has changed them and help them to grow. The documentary makes the invisible grief of nurses – visible. It aspires to support nurses so they no longer feel alone or isolated in their experiences of grieving, as many nurses can carry the pain and memories of the families’ loss and experiences with them for years.

Jonas-Simpson, C. (Producer) (2010). Research team: Jonas-Simpson, C. (PI), Macdonald, C., McMahon, E., & Pilkington, B.

Funded by AWHONN Canada ; Canadian Nurses Foundation: The Nursing Care Partnership Program (made possible with a grant from the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation). ; Faculty of Health, York University ; Health, Leadership and Learning Network: The Interprofessional Education Initiative, Faculty of Health, York University

To purchase this film, please visit the York University Bookstore.

More by Christine Jonas-Simpson

Why did baby die?: Mothering children living with the loss, love and continuing presence of a baby sibling

Why did baby die?: Mothering children living with the loss, love and continuing presence of a baby sibling captures the profound impact children have on a mother’s grief after the loss of her baby. In this research-based documentary mothers also tell how young children respond to the loss of their baby sibling. Despite the permanence of the physical loss, children continue to connect with their deceased siblings in various ways while creating new meanings of their experience of loss and love which they carry into adolescence.

Funded by Faculty of Health, York University; and the Health, Leadership and Learning Network: The Interprofessional Education Initiative, Faculty of Health, York University

Jonas-Simpson, C. (Producer). (2010)

To purchase this film, please visit the York University Bookstore

 

More by Christine Jonas-Simpson

Ethan’s Butterflies

A Spiritual Book For Parents and Young Children After the Loss of a Baby When a baby dies one of the first concerns a parent has is the impact this loss has on their young living children. It is difficult to know what to say or how to talk about the death of a long-awaited sibling. Ethan’s Butterflies provides a way for parents and professionals to connect with young children who experience the loss of a sibling. This story is written from a young child’s perspective and told by a pink elephant named Emma. Emma describes her deep sadness, anger and fears and poses many questions that children often raise. Emma shows how she and her family learn to live with the loss her baby brother Ethan and how they continue to connect with him in many ways, one of which is a butterfly and another is love.

Excerpts from the book …”One day Momma was very sad and crying. Edgar and I wondered what was wrong? We were scared. Momma and Dadda told us that Ethan died. He was not breathing and his heart was not beating. We looked at our brother Ethan and touched his cold skin. He looked like he [...] continue the story

Boys With Bigger Hearts

MPS II (Hunter Syndrome) is a rare degenerative disease.  Boys With Bigger Hearts is a documentary film dedicated to telling the stories of a few families and individuals affected by this devastating disease in a beautiful and honest way.

2000 people worldwide live with MPS II (or Hunter Syndrome). This film tells the raw and honest stories of four boys affected.

We launched a Kickstarter campaign to secure some short term funding to produce the full length documentary. This documentary has the potential to help increase MPS II awareness and support our end goal to find a cure for MPS II.

In the end we hope this film will help raise awareness and educate people about MPS II. By raising awareness we can support the cause to find a cure.

Useful

A short film featuring the struggles of a doomed couple.

Official music video for ‘Use Somebody’ by Kings Of Leon, performed by Scala & Kolacny brothers. scalachoir.com

Shot on Three days in Brussels and Antwerp, Belgium. 27th of February, 28th of February and 29th of February.

Official selection shortfilmcorner Cannes filmfestival 2011. Best international experimental shortfilm at the New York Independent Film Festival 2011. Young directors award at the Cristal Festival 2011.

Director: Inti Calfat Scenario: Inti Calfat & Hugo Van Laere DOP: Bjorn Charpentier Producer: Frederik Zaman & Mitchel Elsen, TRS Production manager: Thierry Vandenbussche (outlandish) Production Assistant: Mike Madelein Production Assistant: Tatiana De Pret 1st camera Assisitant: Joris Rymen 2nd camera Assistant: Jolien De Graeve Chef Electro: Peter Van Den Bosch Styling: Jan Dendievel & Xavier Make-up: Marie Brabant Production Design: Olya Tsoraeva Decor: Simon Van Laar Special Effects: Martin De La Vallée Editor & composits: Hans Desmet Grading: Veerle Zeelmaeckers Sounddesign: Gregory Caron

Cast: Wife: Marijke Pinoy Husband: Hans Van Cauwenberghe Prostitutes: Dolores Bouckaert, Leen Van Dommel, Elke Shari.

Discovering my last taboo

By Ben Davies

In this article I am going to explore the morality of paying for the company of a female or indeed male if you are a disabled person.

But first I am going to talk about relationships and the potential barriers I feel exist as a disabled person. I personally really struggle with relationships and socialising full stop, whether it’s going the pub with the boys or chatting someone up. I simply cannot do it as my confidence in this area is really low. Overall I’m ok with the boys as we talk about football and drinking, the usual stuff. But when it comes to the ladies, this is where I really struggle.

When I meet a woman I’m attracted to, I know instantly whether they are seeing me or the four wheels I’m sitting on. In my experience a lot see the wheelchair and feel uncomfortable when I start checking them out, just like any other bloke would. Then I have the added barrier of impaired speech so if I do pluck up the courage to speak to them, I get the look that says something like ‘you’re in a wheelchair and you can’t speak properly so piss off.’

The speech [...] continue the story