How Medical Screening Turns Healthy People into Patients Alan Cassels at TEDxVictoria

How Medical Screening Turns Healthy People into Patients.  Alan Cassels at TEDxVictoria A drug policy researcher for the University of Victoria, Alan Cassels is a known for having a knack for finding and describing the chasm between what the market says and what science does in modern healthcare. Over the past two decades Cassels has spent much of his research energy studying clinical research and the marketing tactics of the pharmaceutical industry, turning some of that research into journalism and books, including an international best-seller.

 

Gut Inspired: Rob on being an advocate

Published on Apr 18, 2012 by GutInspired

Rob Hill is a member of Gut Inspired, living with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD; Crohn’s Disease). He is sharing more about his experiences advocating for himself and others as well as actively managing his disease with his health care team. Rob knows the importance of communication and can better manage his symptoms because works together with specialists he trusts. Rob Hill works with the Intestinal Disease, Education and Awareness Society (IDEAS) raising awareness and sharing his experiences through Gut Inspired.

Please share this video with others who may live with IBD and encourage them to talk and learn more about their disease. To learn more about Gut Inspired and Rob’s story, please visit www.facebook.com/gutinspired

How I Became an E-Patient Through Cushing’s Disease

For all of my early life, I was the good, compliant, patient. I took whatever pills the doctor prescribed, did whatever tests h/she (most always a HE) wrote for. Believed that whatever he said was the absolute truth. He had been to med school. He knew what was wrong with me even though he didn’t live in my body 24/7 and experience what I did.

I know a lot of people are still like this. Their doctor is like a god to them. He can do no wrong – even if they don’t feel any better after treatment, even if they feel worse. “But the doctor said…”

Anyway, I digress.

All this changed for me in 1983.

At first I noticed I’d stopped having my periods and, of course, I thought I was pregnant. I went to my Gynecologist who had no explanation. Lots of women lose their periods for a variety of reasons so no one thought that this was really significant.

Then I got really tired, overly tired. I would take my son to a half hour Choir rehearsal and could not stay awake for the whole time. I would lie down in the back of the van, set an alarm and sleep for [...] continue the story

Why I am an Advocate

By Brandon Staglin August 5, 2010

I have schizophrenia, and sometimes I think about whether I have let my illness define my life. I work for my family’s nonprofit, International Mental Health Research Organization (IMHRO), as a mental health advocate. If you asked me when I was a kid what work I would want to do, the last thing I would have said was to take on a family enterprise. I used to value my individuality above anything else, and dreaded being corrupted by conformity. Thanks in part to my illness, my values have shifted since then. I had a psychotic break in 1990, the summer after my freshman year at Dartmouth College. A friend managed to get me to a psychiatry ward. At first, I could not accept that I had a mental illness. I had a life plan, to be an astronautical engineer! I would not be cut down by a schizophrenia diagnosis.

Three nights into my first hospitalization I decided I would get out of the psych ward immediately. I was unable to sleep, furious, and refused to take meds. A nurse was on her way with an injection to make me sleep. I would not let her violate my consciousness! [...] continue the story

The Truth of It: Doug

Doug works in business development for a large software company. He is married and has two children. Doug was diagnosed with prostate cancer at the age of 49. He had a recurrence with metastases 5 years later.