Team Players: Type 1 Athletes To Notice

By Aryssah Stankevitsch

Being diabetic for only two years now, I’ve certainly noticed a difference in how I participate in sports. Prior to, I could be out all day playing hockey in the street, practicing my serve at my local community centre, working on soccer drills with my uncles. I was a bursting ball of energy—never ending. It was annoying to all others I’m sure, and for the most part I still am that way. However, I didn’t need to worry about what I had for breakfast, how much insulin I gave myself last night, or what my blood glucose should be before active behaviour.

Knowing some semblance of how integral controlling your sugars are while being an athlete, is entirely overwhelming. Biking with the Cycle 4 team this summer gave me that semblance, though I’m confident that professional athletes with diabetes have an even more rigorous regime. I’m still athletic, go to the gym everyday, and eat well—but these competitors have to truly be on their game; one low blood sugar can scar your career and reputation, and thus salary and fan base decline. Despite this, determination is a disease that all athletes share, especially those with something to prove on [...] continue the story

Closing the Door on Cycle 4 2011

By Aryssah Stankevitsch

Last time, the Cycle 4 Team and I were continuing our journey across Canada –remaining kilometers: 1500, Toronto to Digby. We had already completed roughly 5500 from British Columbia. So no sweat, right?

Well, no. There was sweat. Plenty of it. Half of the reason cyclists always wear glasses is to avoid rain, bugs or dirt in their eyes. The other half is to avoid sweat splashing from the rider in front of them.

No matter the amount of perspiration, the next few hundred kilometers would be extremely special for me. I was fortunate enough to bike through my hometown in Toronto’s east end, and enjoy seeing all the places that have meaning to me; my grandparents’ street, the Tim Horton’s where I usually meet friends, the mall where I had my first job.

My second “hometown” of Kingston, where I spend more than half the year as a student at Queen’s was also one of our stops. To see my friends and family welcoming me home, in both cities, just spurred me on to pedal faster and harder for the last few legs of our ride into Quebec, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia.

I can firmly say that no other region [...] continue the story