Life – Jibon

Personal and private story of a family of Guwahati having a 12 years old boy named Ron suffering from Duchenne’s Muscular Dystrophy, a rare disease having no cure at sight. It is shot in actual locations with real-life characters. The film is shot with the real characters acting in their life story.

A Leap Ahead

Disability is only in the mind and anything can be achieved through determination, self-motivation and commitment. When a “Mongolian” baby was born in Chuttur’s family, the entire life of mother gets focused around this child. She nurtured and raised him to stand along with normal kids. Observing the efforts and patience of the wife, Subhash Chuttur started experimenting with mentally challenged, employing them for simple jobs. One by one, the number of these experiences increased and so also did the confidence of Subhash Chuttur. Today he does not stop at that, but takes every opportunity to convince others to employ such persons. This film sends a message, how such specially-able persons can be integrated within society. More importantly, it also conveys a need for change in attitudes toward the disabled people in society.

My Hands

Sunder is a 21-year-old young man whose both hands are crippled and desolately useless. He suffers from cerebral palsy. Born into a poor family of utensil-makers with five children, Sunders’ condition seems pathetically hopeless. The moment he raises up from the bed, his younger brother Santosh becomes his hands. Santosh tends Sunder like his own body by helping him with toileting, brushing his mouth and washing him up and any sort of food consumption. But Sunder has a secret. He attends high school and is currently in his pre-graduation. He has learned to use his foot as his hand. At night he studies by sitting in the bed beside a lantern. Sunder wishes to finish his graduation, find a job and support his poor family.

Life for a Child

Diabetes is fast emerging as one of the most serious health problems of our time – a global epidemic that claims more lives each year than HIV/AIDS. Children with diabetes in the developing world are particularly vulnerable. Many lack access to proper care and the life-saving medicines they need to survive. As a result, they become chronically ill; many die quickly, while others develop severe complications such as kidney failure, blindness and nerve damage. Directed by Academy Award-nominee Edward Lachman, the documentary “Life for a Child” follows the journeys of children with Type 1 diabetes amid the verdant mountains and swarming streets of Nepal, one the world’s poorest countries. Through their eyes and in their words, we experience their life-and-death struggle to survive – and, in fact, even thrive.

Beyond the Light

Guitarist and music teacher Kyaw Kyaw has been blind since birth. In “Beyond the Light”, he talks candidly about his life and his perceptions of the world around him. Blind since birth, he talks of his despair at life, and how taking up the guitar brought him salvation.