Painting Pain Art Gallery – Three

Breast Cancer Mastectomy

I am a woman thru and thru. I am not defined by the size of my breast. I am sexy with an A cup or a D cup. I am sexy even with only 1 breast. I feel beautiful, therefore I am beautiful. A womans beauty comes from within and not from what is on the outside. I am beautiful, see me shine, I still have one left behind, a woman I am until the end, even though I am not a ten, my beauty is here, it’s now within, I am a woman till the end. Poem by: Nancy Crowell

Laura’s Foot This morning I woke somewhere between 6:00 and 6:30 AM. I do not know the reason I woke. I had only been “asleep” for about five hours, maybe less. I went to “bed” at just about 11:30 PM. I cannot see in the mornings, so everything was a myriad of light and dark, without color. I cannot hear normal sounds in the morning. I only hear a combination of ocean roar, antique radio and television static and my own heartbeat as loud as Poe’s Telltale heart. I lay there on my bed staring up, as even rolling over to get out of bed can take ten [...] continue the story

Tig Notaro and Breast Cancer

A message from Louis CK: Tig is a friend of mine and she is very funny.  I love her voice on stage.   One night I was performing at a club in LA called Largo.  Tig was there.   She was about to go on stage.   I hadn’t seen Tig in about a year and I said how are you?   She replied “well I found out today that I have cancer in both breasts and that it has likely spread to my lymph nodes.  My doctor says it looks real bad. “. She wasn’t kidding.  I said “uh.  Jesus.  Tig.  Well. Do you… Have your family… Helping?”. She said “well my mom was with me but a few weeks ago she fell down, hit her head and she died”.  She still wasn’t kidding.

Now, I’m pretty stupid to begin with, and I sure didn’t know what to say now.  I opened my mouth and this came out.  “Jeez, Tig.   I.   Really value you.  Highly.”.  She said “I value you highly too, Louie.”.  Then she held up a wad of note-paper in her hand and said “I’m gonna talk about all of it on stage now.  It’s probably going [...] continue the story

The Moth Presents Amy Cohen: Fighting Chance

“I do not feel unfortunate.”

Confronting an overwhelming genetic predisposition for breast cancer, a comedy writer makes the ultimate choice.

Amy Cohen is the author of The New York Times best-seller The Late Bloomer’s Revolution. She’s been both a writer and producer for the sitcoms Caroline in the City and Spin City, wrote a dating column for the New York Observer, and was the dating correspondent for cable TV’s New York Central. Amy lives in New York City.

Breast cancer…not just a disease of older women

Shanna (Shan) had a kind heart, gentle spirit and a smile that would radiate across the room. Shan was a gifted artist, skilled swimming instructor and professional figure skating coach. Shan loved to work with children and planned to teach. She had graduated from university and was heading off to teacher’s college when she was diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer.

Living her beliefs, Shan always took a positive outlook on life. She accepted the tests and breast cancer treatments with determined optimism and said “let’s get this show on the road.” Sadly the predictions of hope were not to be realized and Shan passed away a few months later. Like many young adults, Shan’s symptoms were misdiagnosed, her cancer was not detected early and it spread quickly. Shan was only 24.

Friends and family bonded together in their loss to preserve Shan’s spirit. Team Shan Breast Cancer Awareness for Young Women (Team Shan), a Canadian charity, was established in Shan’s memory to raise awareness that breast cancer is not just a disease of older women. The Team Shan logo and sunflower graphics used in our work were inspired from Shan’s original artwork.

Team Shan has produced a successful communication model to reach young [...] continue the story

The Importance of Transforming My Mind

By: Jean Lee , Taiwan

Fourteen years ago, I got cancer. Due to mistaken diagnosis, my breast cancer was already in phase II when it was confirmed. I had total resection and chemotherapy nine times. My husband told me, “You are the pillar of our home. If you are happy, the whole family will be happy!” This encouraged me to put my sadness away and face my fears. I chose to forgive my doctor for the misdiagnosis and worked voluntarily to serve other cancer patients in the hospital. When everything seemed back to normal, I got a more severe test. Five years later, my cancer transferred to my bones and the doctor warned me that I could be paralyzed. So, I accepted another 17 radiation treatments. After 6 months, the cancer transferred to my neck lymph, liver, etc. and I began living with a series of chemotherapies. Three years ago, in a fortuitous opportunity, I went to the “Taiwan Cancer Friends New Life Association”, a daycare center with volunteers to accompany cancer patients every day. We practiced whirling meditation exercises, attended a support group, and took part in body-mind-spiritual classes in the center. I felt so good to be a member [...] continue the story