You Can Do This: Type 1 Diabetes

As part of the You Can Do This Project, here’s my submission. A little attempted diabetes poetry. 🙂

Kerri Sparling June 15, 2011

Epatient interview: The diabetes community in Europe

Anne Seubert speaks about using social media in Europe to get more information about her type 1 diabetes.

Anne Seubert September 15, 2011

From Fear to Life

From Fear to Life is about two sick children who suffer from diabetes and kidney disease and struggle against disease full of hope and love, as well as faith toward the future though life has treated them badly. They differ from the children of the same age by boundless love towards society, kindness and beauty. Even in bad social conditions, they go on creating – which proves that the terrible seconds of fear they felt a few years ago had already been forgotten. But in some way they are also forgotten by us (our society). There exists the problem of medicine and a lot of other social problems in addition. The film aims to throw light upon the problems of children living among us and needing our help. It also illustrates that those children have a right to live and create for being integrated in our society. Their talent and inborn gifts constitute their rights to be a full part of our society.

Life for a Child

Diabetes is fast emerging as one of the most serious health problems of our time – a global epidemic that claims more lives each year than HIV/AIDS. Children with diabetes in the developing world are particularly vulnerable. Many lack access to proper care and the life-saving medicines they need to survive. As a result, they become chronically ill; many die quickly, while others develop severe complications such as kidney failure, blindness and nerve damage. Directed by Academy Award-nominee Edward Lachman, the documentary “Life for a Child” follows the journeys of children with Type 1 diabetes amid the verdant mountains and swarming streets of Nepal, one the world’s poorest countries. Through their eyes and in their words, we experience their life-and-death struggle to survive – and, in fact, even thrive.

Closing the Door on Cycle 4 2011

By Aryssah Stankevitsch

Last time, the Cycle 4 Team and I were continuing our journey across Canada –remaining kilometers: 1500, Toronto to Digby. We had already completed roughly 5500 from British Columbia. So no sweat, right?

Well, no. There was sweat. Plenty of it. Half of the reason cyclists always wear glasses is to avoid rain, bugs or dirt in their eyes. The other half is to avoid sweat splashing from the rider in front of them.

No matter the amount of perspiration, the next few hundred kilometers would be extremely special for me. I was fortunate enough to bike through my hometown in Toronto’s east end, and enjoy seeing all the places that have meaning to me; my grandparents’ street, the Tim Horton’s where I usually meet friends, the mall where I had my first job.

My second “hometown” of Kingston, where I spend more than half the year as a student at Queen’s was also one of our stops. To see my friends and family welcoming me home, in both cities, just spurred me on to pedal faster and harder for the last few legs of our ride into Quebec, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia.

I can firmly say that no other region [...] continue the story