Team Players: Type 1 Athletes To Notice

By Aryssah Stankevitsch

Being diabetic for only two years now, I’ve certainly noticed a difference in how I participate in sports. Prior to, I could be out all day playing hockey in the street, practicing my serve at my local community centre, working on soccer drills with my uncles. I was a bursting ball of energy—never ending. It was annoying to all others I’m sure, and for the most part I still am that way. However, I didn’t need to worry about what I had for breakfast, how much insulin I gave myself last night, or what my blood glucose should be before active behaviour.

Knowing some semblance of how integral controlling your sugars are while being an athlete, is entirely overwhelming. Biking with the Cycle 4 team this summer gave me that semblance, though I’m confident that professional athletes with diabetes have an even more rigorous regime. I’m still athletic, go to the gym everyday, and eat well—but these competitors have to truly be on their game; one low blood sugar can scar your career and reputation, and thus salary and fan base decline. Despite this, determination is a disease that all athletes share, especially those with something to prove on [...] continue the story

The DeMoe Family: Early-Onset Alzheimer’s Genetics

Using breakthrough imaging technology, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh are learning how Alzheimer’s pathology progresses in people with the rare, early-onset form of Alzheimer’s, whose genetic mutation determines that they will get the disease. The film follows the DeMoe family, five of whose six children carry the mutation, and we learn about the emotional and personal toll it takes.

Breaking the code of silence

By Sheryl Jedlinski

Fear of where PD will lead us limits contact with people in advanced stages of the disease.

When diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, I had many questions and fears but couldn’t bring myself to seek help from a support group or attend a patient education symposium. My need for answers was not nearly as great as my fear of seeing others in advanced disease stages and thinking how that could be me someday. I never imagined that I might also meet people who were doing well despite living with Parkinson’s for many years.

For a long time, I believed I was the only person with Parkinson’s who avoided those in advanced disease stages. I felt guilty about this and hoped others would not one day find me too scary to look at. These feelings are the white elephant in the room that no one acknowledges, though we all have them. Sharing our feelings and fears, and helping each other get past these is essential to weakening PD’s hold on us.

Over time, I developed a coping strategy that enabled me to attend symposiums. My husband and I would arrive late and sit in the back where all I could see were people’s [...] continue the story

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