Toughing Up

By MickeyMic October 3, 2011

I heard those words- “You have MS”, and I found myself making that choice- to accept, to learn, to strive, to “tough up” and take it on. “Toughing up” has become a daily endeavor, and I accept it. I heard those words- “Your MS has progressed, and you now have Epilepsy”, and I absorbed the shock the only way I knew how- I “toughed up” and moved forward as best I could. “Toughing up”- it’s a constant companion. I heard those words- “You have breast cancer”, and it stopped me dead in my tracks- until my constant companion tapped me on the shoulder. Fighting the good fight demands an attempt at “toughing up”, even if you don’t do it as gracefully as you hoped you would. In living with MS, “toughing up” is what we do- every day and at any given moment. “Toughing up”- it’s what we do. We never know what is coming next, but what ever it is, I’m on the ready. I’m “toughing up”!

Our Kids – Meet Elijah

In certain ways, Elijah, 6, is like any other child his age. He cries when he’s upset, he laughs when he’s having fun and attends grade one with other 6-year-old boys and girls. But only a year ago, he had difficulty expressing himself in these ways. At first glance today, you might not notice that Elijah struggles with epilepsy.

For nearly five years, Elijah was in and out of SickKids for tests, procedures and admissions. He was having up to six epileptic seizures per day. Since every case of epilepsy is different, he was constantly trying new prescriptions, combinations of medications and special diets. One medication was particularly effective, but caused significant side effects, including lowering his immune system.

Managing his seizures and reducing side effects from medications was a constant balancing act.

Running out of options, Elijah’s parents made the difficult decision for Elijah to have surgery to remove the portion of his brain controlling the seizure activity. The area was identified through advanced brain imaging techniques at SickKids.

Elijah had surgery in September 2010. His alertness and motor skills improved immediately and he has had an impressive reduction in seizures since then. Once completely nonverbal, Elijah is now starting to learn simple [...] continue the story

My Flesh and Blood 01/06

My Flesh and Blood is a 2003 documentary film by Jonathan Karsh chronicling a year in the life of the Tom family. The Tom family is notable as the mother, Susan, adopted eleven children, most of whom had serious disabilities or diseases. The film itself is notable for handling the sensitive subject matter in an unsentimental way that is more uplifting than one might expect. It was nominated for and won several awards, including the Audience Award and the Director’s Award at the Sundance Film Festival.

My Flesh and Blood 02/06

My Flesh and Blood is a 2003 documentary film by Jonathan Karsh chronicling a year in the life of the Tom family. The Tom family is notable as the mother, Susan, adopted eleven children, most of whom had serious disabilities or diseases. The film itself is notable for handling the sensitive subject matter in an unsentimental way that is more uplifting than one might expect. It was nominated for and won several awards, including the Audience Award and the Director’s Award at the Sundance Film Festival.

My Flesh and Blood 03/06

My Flesh and Blood is a 2003 documentary film by Jonathan Karsh chronicling a year in the life of the Tom family. The Tom family is notable as the mother, Susan, adopted eleven children, most of whom had serious disabilities or diseases. The film itself is notable for handling the sensitive subject matter in an unsentimental way that is more uplifting than one might expect. It was nominated for and won several awards, including the Audience Award and the Director’s Award at the Sundance Film Festival.