The Waiting Room: Fatherhood

William Morgan and his three sons Matthew, Joshua and Andrew wait for their mom to get medication to treat her diabetes.

The Man Who Couldn’t Eat

By Jon Reiner

This feels so illicit. And stupid. But really, I must lick this french fry. I’m not asking to eat it, mind you, that wouldn’t be good. I just want to lick it. Taste its salt. I cower in the kitchen, hiding from my wife and boys, who are out there, on the other side of the door, enjoying a sumptuous dinner, like eaters do — devouring what’s delicious, picking at what is not, saving room for dessert — while I starve.

Yes, I’m starving. There’s been nothing for two months now. No food, no drink, nothing in my mouth except the air I keep sucking. It would be plain to say the hunger is driving me mad, because it is. I crave food more than sex. The smell and touch of food can drop me to my knees. Food left me suddenly, in the chaos of emergency surgery, and, empty of food, I think about it constantly, an obsession that magnifies the ordinary into the surreal. A simple french fry is a wonder, an uneaten crust of bread salvation; something as unattainable as a fried egg, life itself. This trance is not healthy, or normal, but then those two [...] continue the story

Defying the Odds – Living with ALS

The Robertsons share their experiences living with ALS and how their support systems help them. Thank you to the Robertsons, for all you do in the ALS community, and to Kyle and Matt for filming/creating this video.

My Cousin Kristin

*** Editor’s Note: Mitch was 12 years old when he delivered this speech to his school.

————————————————————————————————————————- Just close your eyes and imagine. Imagine you are in a room at a hospital waiting for the doctor to arrive after a checkup. Then the doctor comes out and says, “Well, I hate to say it but… you have cancer.” Hello teachers, judges and fellow students.

To many of you this is just an imaginary scene. But for many people, this imaginary scene is a reality.

Nine years ago this happened to my cousin, Kristin Malone, when she was only seven years old.

It was May 19th, 1994. She had not been feeling well, so she went for a check up with her doctor. She went back to school that day and my aunt went back to work. They thought everything was fine. Then while at work, my aunt got a call from the doctor’s office. They suspected Leukemia! The doctor told her to take Kristin immediately to the Children’s Hospital in Calgary, Alberta.

Imagine how terrifying that would be! You are in your car, on the way to see if you have cancer or not.

Immediately, Kristin had blood tests, and the doctors had to get a sample of [...] continue the story

Now To Tell the Kids…

By Soania Mathur

Time to tell the kids… As I laid down with my youngest daughter tonight, as I usually do while she drifts off to sleep, she looked at me and asked in a tired but inquisitive voice, “Were you born with Parkinson’s”. “Well, it’s a little complicated…” I began. This is just one of many questions I’ve fielded from my girls over the years. “Does your medicine make you feel better?” “How can you swallow so many pills?” “Mama, why are you limping? Did you hurt your foot? ” “Why can’t they find something to make you better?” And my favorite “If I hold your hand forever, will it stop shaking?”

I still marvel at the matter-of-fact nature of the conversations we have about Parkinson’s and the comfortable manner in which our girls discuss this disease. It’s exactly the way I had hoped my Parkinson’s would be perceived by my daughters – as a part of life’s challenges that can be dealt with, not as a frightening life stressor. Children these days are having enough difficulty navigating the world, dealing with school, peer groups, hormones and so on and the last thing I ever wanted was to add to their burden.

Let’s [...] continue the story