Between Life And Death Part 5

Provocative documentary following the doctors who can now interrupt, and even reverse, the process of death. Filmed over six months in the country’s leading brain injury unit (Addenbooke’s Hospital, Cambridge), it follows the journey of a man who, by only moving his eyes, is eventually asked if he wants to live or die. Two other families are also plunged into the most ethically difficult decision in modern medicine.

My Hands

Sunder is a 21-year-old young man whose both hands are crippled and desolately useless. He suffers from cerebral palsy. Born into a poor family of utensil-makers with five children, Sunders’ condition seems pathetically hopeless. The moment he raises up from the bed, his younger brother Santosh becomes his hands. Santosh tends Sunder like his own body by helping him with toileting, brushing his mouth and washing him up and any sort of food consumption. But Sunder has a secret. He attends high school and is currently in his pre-graduation. He has learned to use his foot as his hand. At night he studies by sitting in the bed beside a lantern. Sunder wishes to finish his graduation, find a job and support his poor family.

Living and Dying in Wait

In Quebec in 2008, the average wait time for the elderly infirm to get permanent placement in a public long-term care home is about a year. Temporary placements are sometimes available to patients coming from hospitals, but the families often have little or no say about where the patients get sent. Sometimes they die waiting.