Grief, A Necessary Part of Accepting Diabetes

Michelle Sorensen | December 18, 2012

I don’t remember the first time I had to inject myself with a needle. I don’t remember being taught how to test my blood sugar. But I have many memories of being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. In retrospect, the day of my diagnosis was the beginning of a long process of grieving my diabetes. At the time, however, I had no idea that being diagnosed with a chronic illness would involve a grieving process.

Elisabeth Kübler-Ross famously outlined the stages of grief in her 1969 book called On Death and Dying. She described five stages (denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance) that describe a process by which people deal with grief and tragedy. Many people think of the stages of grief as just relating to loss of a loved one. These stages, however, apply to many types of loss, including divorce, job loss, dealing with terminal illness, or the diagnosis of a life-changing and life-threatening disease like diabetes. The stages are not in a consistent order and people may go back and forth between different stages. Also, not everyone experiences all the stages. The way each person experiences grief is unique.

On the day I was [...] continue the story

Perinatal Loss – Open to Hope Radio

Published on Nov 13, 2012

Christine Jonas-Simpson is an Associate Professor in the School of Nursing at York University in Toronto. After the loss of her own baby boy in 2001 she began to focus her arts-based research on how human beings live and transform with loss. She is currently working on a documentary series and is the author of the children’s book, Ethan’s Butterflies.

 

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The Moth Presents Anthony Griffith: The Best of Times, The Worst of Times

A comic must earn his living as a clown while suffering the ultimate heartbreak.

Anthony Griffith lives in the mountains of California at 5,000 feet elevation in an animal protected community. It’s much different from the inner city of Chicago where he used to live, but he still travels doing stand-up. He says that the overwhelming positive response of him telling his story at The Moth has prompted him to write a one man show and pen other short stories now in development.

Nurses Grieve Too: Insights into Experiences with Perinatal Loss

This ground-breaking documentary shares what grief is for nurses who care for bereaved families with perinatal loss. This research-based documentary answers the research question: What is the experience of grieving, for obstetrical and neonatal nurses caring for families who experience perinatal loss? Nurses describe the professional and personal impact of grieving, what helps them and how the experience has changed them and help them to grow. The documentary makes the invisible grief of nurses – visible. It aspires to support nurses so they no longer feel alone or isolated in their experiences of grieving, as many nurses can carry the pain and memories of the families’ loss and experiences with them for years.

Jonas-Simpson, C. (Producer) (2010). Research team: Jonas-Simpson, C. (PI), Macdonald, C., McMahon, E., & Pilkington, B.

Funded by AWHONN Canada ; Canadian Nurses Foundation: The Nursing Care Partnership Program (made possible with a grant from the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation). ; Faculty of Health, York University ; Health, Leadership and Learning Network: The Interprofessional Education Initiative, Faculty of Health, York University

To purchase this film, please visit the York University Bookstore.

More by Christine Jonas-Simpson

Why did baby die?: Mothering children living with the loss, love and continuing presence of a baby sibling

Why did baby die?: Mothering children living with the loss, love and continuing presence of a baby sibling captures the profound impact children have on a mother’s grief after the loss of her baby. In this research-based documentary mothers also tell how young children respond to the loss of their baby sibling. Despite the permanence of the physical loss, children continue to connect with their deceased siblings in various ways while creating new meanings of their experience of loss and love which they carry into adolescence.

Funded by Faculty of Health, York University; and the Health, Leadership and Learning Network: The Interprofessional Education Initiative, Faculty of Health, York University

Jonas-Simpson, C. (Producer). (2010)

To purchase this film, please visit the York University Bookstore

 

More by Christine Jonas-Simpson

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