No Hockey? No Problem!

By Dave N.

Imagine that you have to tell your young son that he cannot play hockey with his friends. This son may be around nine or ten years old, and his friends have told him that the hockey they play is non-contact. Imagine how hard it would be to tell your son that he cannot play organized hockey, our national past time, because of a medical condition where an awkward fall into the boards or a fall on a shift could be life-threatening.

I have a bleeding disorder known as hemophilia. My blood lacks a certain protein in the clotting process, Factor VIII, and I need to take this replacement factor intravenously whenever I experience internal bleeding. My medical condition does not allow me to play any intensely physical sports like hockey or football.

When I was around ten, one of my good friends told me about the non-contact hockey league he played in, and I tried to convince my parents to enroll me in the coming fall. Both of my parents told me that they did not think it would be a good idea, but, being a ten year old, I pleaded with them to enroll me. “But it’s non-contact!” I [...] continue the story

Ben Fanelli Story – Head Strong

Brain injury occurs suddenly, without warning. In an instant life is changed, forever. Canadian Hockey League defenseman Ben Fanelli knows this first hand. In October of 2009 Ben suffered a head injury that changed his life. Because of this Ben has realized the need for Brain Injury Awareness and funding. And that is why he teamed up with the Kitchener Rangers to start Head Strong; Fanelli 4 Brain Injury Awareness: a program designed to raise awareness about brain injuries and provide funds to various Brain Injury associations and programs.

Protected: No Hockey. No Problem. 2.

By Dave N.

Imagine that you have to tell your young son that he cannot play hockey with his friends. This son may be around nine or ten years old, and his friends have told him that the hockey they play is non-contact. Imagine how hard it would be to tell your son that he cannot play organized hockey, our national past time, because of a medical condition where an awkward fall into the boards or a fall on a shift could be life-threatening.

I have a bleeding disorder known as hemophilia. My blood lacks a certain protein in the clotting process, Factor VIII, and I need to take this replacement factor intravenously whenever I experience internal bleeding. My medical condition does not allow me to play any intensely physical sports like hockey or football.

When I was around ten, one of my good friends told me about the non-contact hockey league he played in, and I tried to convince my parents to enroll me in the coming fall. Both of my parents told me that they did not think it would be a good idea, but, being a ten year old, I pleaded with them to enroll me. “But it’s non-contact!” I [...] continue the story