Why we think IBD should be considered a Chronic Illness

Published on Nov 25, 2013

Elliott and Rob from Gut Inspired, a group of Canadians living with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD; Crohn’s Disease and ulcerative colitis) talk about why IBD should be considered a ‘chronic illness’. When living with IBD, understanding and support are incredibly important. Imagine a world where you don’t have to explain what living with IBD is like because your friends, family and employers already know, where the government sees digestive disease as a priority and where people experiencing IBD symptoms are identified and diagnosed right away. We think this is possible if you keep taking the time to tell others what it is like living with IBD. Elliott, and Rob share from their first-hand experience living with IBD and challenges they have faced in hopes that their actions, might help others. We hope you share your story too. For more information about Gut Inspired and living well with IBD visit www.gutinspired.ca or join the conversation. www.Facebook.com/gutinspired www.twitter.com/gut_inspired | @gut_inspired

Happily Ever After My Diagnosis

On December 15th, 2009, I was matched up on eHarmony with a man named David (for the SECOND time – long story, I’ll explain later!!!). Being tired of waiting for the men to make the first move and message me first, I sent him my initial questions. I was a little surprised when he responded, but he did and shortly after that (January 23rd of 2010 to be exact) we started dating.

About a year later, in January of 2011, the symptoms started. It began with diarrhea and rapidly advanced to severe rectal bleeding. I told David that I was having some digestive issues, but didn’t mention the blood (I mean, who wants to tell their boyfriend about their bathroom habits!?). I thought it was a tummy bug on top of vicious hemorrhoids, so I ignored it. I started going to the bathroom 20+ times a day. Sometimes those bathroom visits would produce nothing but pools of blood in the bottom of the toilet. I finally went to the doctor at the end of January and by Valentine’s Day of 2011 I had my diagnosis of Ulcerative Colitis.

As I’ve browsed the message boards and support groups, I am overwhelmed with the [...] continue the story

Am I addicted?

Posted on December 2, 2013

Since being diagnosed over 6 years ago I have become very blasé about “popping” pills. There have been times in my treatment when I have been taking 12 pills before I had even had my morning wash. I guess I tried to be as ignorant as possible to what I was taking in a blind hope that they would offer some relief from my Crohn’s Disease symptoms. No matter what my ailment, there always seemed to be an extra pill that could be taken.

Even now that I am more educated to what the medications do and how they work, it doesn’t stop me dropping a pill a soon as something doesn’t feel quite right.

If I feel nauseous I take a pill, if I get a headache I take a pill and if my tummy shows any sign of not being in any way cooperative then I will take a pill.

It is not until you make a conscious effort to monitor or restrict the amount of medication you take that you begin to notice just the quantity of medication you are reliant on.

Alongside my Mercaptopurine I was regularly taking a dose of Imodium and paracetamol. It had [...] continue the story

Bowel transplant patient experience

Michael Seres talks about his bowel transplant experience relating it to how and why patients need to be part of the decision making process. He speaks to surgeons, clinicians and doctors at the Intestinal Transplant Symposium held in Oxford in June 2013.

Follow Michael on Twitter @mjseres

Or his blog Being A Patient Isn’t Easy

 

More from Michael Seres

A Partner In Crohn’s

Posted: 22 Jun 2013 11:37 AM PDT

I talk to many people throughout my life that suffer with an IBD, either through Twitter (@MrAwesomeBen), my blog or my local Crohn’s and Colitis UK (Leicestershire & Rutland) charity. These people have become a cruck for me to rely on. They know, pretty much, what I am going through. These people, some of whom are complete strangers, people who I would not recognise if I passed them in the street, are there for me and vice-versa.

I bang on about not suffering alone, especially in this modern era of the internet where a new friendship with someone is only a click away.  You can hide any embarrassment or anxiety behind the computer screen.

I class myself to be extremely lucky in this world. I found love. I found a woman to share my world with, who accepts me for what and who I am.

Granted neither of us knew at the beginning the trouble I would put us through with my diagnosis but I doubt that would have changed a thing. I struggle to remember a time where she wasn’t a part of my life.

Now I don’t want this blog to sound like one massive brag. [...] continue the story

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