Fighting Crohn’s Disease on a Tandem

Posted: 08 Apr 2013 05:52 AM PDT

Hello to all my Crohnies old and new.  I am sat writing this latest blog while slightly spaced out on pain killers, home off work due to my silly tummy and even sillier IBD.

Over the weekend I helped celebrate my wife’s Grandma’s 90th birthday. This celebration included a lot of party food and subsequently led to a rather upset bowel.

Yesterday saw me struggle with diarrhoea which I tried to control with loperamide tablets (Imodium) then during the night I had really bad cramps which meant I didn’t sleep well and had to call in sick to work (I probably overused the loperamide).

As I’ve mentioned before, calling in sick to work is something I try not to do too often but sometimes there is no choice.

This is just a usual weekend for me and my Crohn’s and it isn’t even at its worse. It can be a horrible disease to have to live with. It is incurable. It can be suppressed by medication but not forever. You are always looking over your shoulder; waiting for Mr Crohn’s to return.

Because of this disease and its sister, Colitis, a charity called Crohn’s and Colitis UK was set [...] continue the story

Stubborn Head, Stubborn Bowel

Posted: 02 Jan 2013 10:36 AM PST

I don’t know about you but I really don’t like giving up. I have always been stubborn but ever since my Crohn’s diagnosis I think I have become even more stubborn. I think I lie more too, nothing grand just little white lies about how well I am. These lies are not to mislead others; they are aimed at misleading myself.

If I tell myself I am well enough to do something then most of the time I will do it. My stubbornness and self lies get me through most situations. I’m not one for being defeated, so if I have a task to do, I get on with it regardless. This is not always a good way to live. I think I am scared of falling down some kind of slippery slope of laziness, as if my independence is at stake.

If I can’t do one thing due to my illness, will I refuse to do another? Will it trigger a domino effect? As a sufferer of a chronic illness with no chance of a respite I have plenty of valid reasons why I should go easier on myself but I can’t. I will not [...] continue the story

I Have Crohn’s Disease

Mike says:

‘Since being diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease in 2007, I’ve pilgrimaged, like so many others, on that long road toward the Mecca of consistent bowel health. So far, I’ve found the way to be not-so-difficult. I’m fortunate. Good doctor, relatively mild case. Still, what a frustrating, inexplicable disease Crohn’s can be! Embarrassing, slapdash, specific in its unspecificity. And that the origins of Crohn’s remain a mystery (i.e. we know what it *is*, just not *why* it is), a mystery even as more and more people seem to be “coming down” with a case, can tend one toward paranoid conjecture. Is it the environment causing this? Modern practices in the processing, preservation and packaging of foodstuffs? A general national over-tendency toward neurotic sanitization (some germs are actually good for you, toughen you)?

Who can say? Doctors, I suppose.

I am not a doctor. I’m a 33-year-old man who would like not to have blood in his stool. To that end (pun!), this comic – a gloss on that initial diagnosis and the perplexing, discomfiting months leading up to it – was my way of wresting a smidge of control from a situation bigger and more powerful than me. Bigger and yet, perhaps poignantly, [...] continue the story

Girls-With-Guts: Megan’s Story

When the Little Things Make a Big Difference

My college campus wasn’t very big. It only took 10 minutes to walk across the entire thing, and less to go from class to class. But even so, I remember running out of one class to use the nearest bathroom, and walking, defeated, to the next building for my next class, just to have that dreaded feeling of urgency hit again.

Junior year of college was one of the hardest times I have had in dealing with my IBD. I had been diagnosed just two years prior, and I had had it for long enough to accept that I was never going to be healthy again. But since I was diagnosed at essentially the beginning of my college experience, I didn’t know enough about sharing it with other people, and I didn’t have any good friends to be supportive. Basically, every day of junior year was just dealing, trying to get through one day at a time, and hoping the next one would be better. This included many days spent missing class, staying near a bathroom, and visits to the doctor or ER.

Although I was unsure of how both my disease and my college career would turn [...] continue the story

Michael Seres @11.38pm

Friday, 7 October 2011

Well we just got the call that a bowel has become available and we are now on route to oxford. It really is the most nerve racking thing you could ever wish to happen. My wife and I just didn’t know what to say to each other when the call came.

They have told me so far that my estimated surgery time is 7am as they have to retrieve the bowel. Also they cannot give the final go ahead until they see the bowel.

I will keep you posted as to what happens. Am currently on the m25 and I don’t really know what more to say. You wait for this to happen but when it does its so so scary.

Speak later its going to be a long night.

XX Michael Seres

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