Tony Nicklinson (Locked-in Syndrome) BBC News Part 1

In 2005 Tony Nicklinson had a catastrophic stroke, which has left him utterly paralysed. He has what is known as ‘locked in syndrome’ and cannot move, talk, feed himself or perform even the most basic function without help. He can only communicate via a computer controlled by his eyes.

In this two part series Tony speak with BBC News about wanting to end his life.

Tony Nicklinson (Locked-in Syndrome) BBC News Part 2

In 2005 Tony Nicklinson had a catastrophic stroke, which has left him utterly paralysed. He has what is known as ‘locked in syndrome’ and cannot move, talk, feed himself or perform even the most basic function without help. He can only communicate via a computer controlled by his eyes.

In this two part series Tony speak with BBC News about wanting to end his life.

Locked-In Syndrome | Tony Nicklinson’s Story

A locked-in syndrome patient has tweeted for the first time. It is believed to be the first time ever a patient with this condition has tweeted using special eye movement technology.

Tony Nicklinson, who seven years ago had a major stroke that left his body completely paralysed, but his mind unharmed, tweeted the simple message: @TonyNicklinson Hello world. I am tony nicklinson, I have locked-in syndrome and this is my first ever tweet. #tony The moment was captured by Channel 4 Dispatches ahead of a programme which broadcasts next week (Monday 18th June at 8pm) about Tony’s life and his forthcoming landmark court hearing, which will directly consider for the first time the question of euthanasia — where a doctor is authorised to take the life of a patient.

Tony’s story will broadcast on Channel 4 Dispatches on Monday 18th June at 8pm and afterwards online. For residents outside of the UK the following 3:00 minute segment has become available – http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/video/2012/jun/18/locked-in-syndrome-tony-nicklinson-video  

 

The Boy Whose Skin Fell Off Part One

Jonny Kennedy died in 2003 aged 36. He had a terrible genetic condition called Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB) – which meant that his skin literally fell off at the slightest touch, leaving his body covered in agonising sores and leading to a final fight against skin cancer. In his last months Jonny decided to work with filmmaker Patrick Collerton to document his life and death, and the result was a film, first broadcast in March 2004, that was an uplifting, confounding and provocatively humorous story of a singular man.

The Boy Whose Skin Fell Off Part Two

Jonny Kennedy died in 2003 aged 36. He had a terrible genetic condition called Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB) – which meant that his skin literally fell off at the slightest touch, leaving his body covered in agonising sores and leading to a final fight against skin cancer. In his last months Jonny decided to work with filmmaker Patrick Collerton to document his life and death, and the result was a film, first broadcast in March 2004, that was an uplifting, confounding and provocatively humorous story of a singular man.

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