Ethan’s Story: Hockey, Guts and Diabetes

Published on Sep 14, 2012

Ethan tells us what its like to grow up with Type 1 diabetes from a very young age. Great and powerful insights for people living with diabetes, their families and health care professionals. This film has been used as curriculum for the University Of Toronto medical program. Funded by The York University Nursing Academy. Directed by Robert Hawke.

Life is Hard

I have been avoiding the internet, blogging, and all things online for the past week or so. I have touched in with facebook, and occasionally made sure I didn’t have any important e-mails pending, but mostly I have gone off the grid.

I have also been hiding in my room.

Here is why: my son was just diagnosed with Apergers, OCD, ADHD, ODD, a mood disorder, social phobia, and sensory processing disorders. He may also have an eating disorder. In the last week, I have seen what it is like for a child to lose control and rage without remembering the incident, or even knowing why. I have watched my son struggle to understand why he has to take new medications everyday and what the name/label of Aspergers means. I have learned that I am not alone amongst even my neighbors in dealing with this disorder, and I have cried for the child that I thought I had.

Life was not fun this week, and this blog is about the joy in life. My son was the one thing in our lives that we could count on as being good. My husband and I both suffer from chronic illnesses, my pituitary gland has [...] continue the story

Awake

By Nicole Ferraro January 2012

I blinked my eyes open. Early morning sunlight sneaked through the blinds on my window, casting a glow on the mess on my floor. Sitting up, I saw my bedroom in complete disarray. There were ripped Hefty bags and stuffed animals spanning twenty-four years strewn across my rug. My room looked like the scene of a barnyard massacre. Looking under my covers, I discovered I was clutching a giant pastel-blue stuffed bunny I’d received as an Easter gift when I was twelve. I could only assume I had spent hours in frantic search of this toy, tearing through our storage areas until I located it. I didn’t remember doing any of that, couldn’t remember the evening at all. But I never could when I was on Ambien. Groggy and confused, I tossed my comforter to the side and started to clean up the mess.

Insomnia had been a part of who I was for most of my life. As an adolescent growing up in Whitestone, Queens, I spent countless nights in my twin bed in the attic staring up at the ceiling, or watching the time on the cable box, waiting for morning. I tried distracting my mind, [...] continue the story

Bret Michaels Diabetes Interview

Bret Michaels discusses growing up with type 1 diabetes and learning of his daughter’s recent pre diabetes diagnosis. He also tests his blood sugar on air.

Mastering Balance Beams: Parenting Children with Muscular Dystrophy

By Joan Fleitas

Have you ever walked on a balance beam? Much like a tight rope, the journey is perilous, with one step cautiously leading the other in an effort to remain stable atop the beam. Despite the winds — despite the narrowness of the beam — despite the distractions from below — the skill can be mastered. With persistence, much support, and an understanding that occasional falls might occur, ‘beam-walkers’ can indeed be successful. Parenting children with muscular dystrophy is much like mastering balance beams.

As parents, we all believe that we should be able to protect our children from harm, socialize them to be exemplary citizens, ensure their perfect health, and craft for them lives where they will surely live ‘happily ever after’. It is as if we perch ourselves on parental thrones when we give them birth. We learn eventually that we are not endowed with such power. When children are diagnosed with muscular dystrophy of any kind, we are given a crash course in humility.

Raising children in the best of circumstances requires that we do a lot of catching up. Just when we think we’ve ‘got it’, when we know how to respond to an infant’s cry, a [...] continue the story