The next revolution in health care? Empathy

Published on Sep 8, 2014

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Paul Rosen, MD, a pediatric rheumatologist, serves as the Clinical Director of Service and Operational Excellence at Nemours. He received a masters of public health degree from Harvard University and a masters of medical management degree from Carnegie Mellon University. He was named ‘One of the First 100 Innovators’ by the U.S Federal Government Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Dr. Rosen’s interests include patient-physician communication, family-centered care, and the patient experience. He teaches medical students about improving the patient experience, and he serves as the faculty mentor for the physician executive leadership program for medical students at Jefferson Medical College. He is also a volunteer faculty member at University of Central Florida College of Medicine.

Using Photography to Give a Voice to Mental Illness

Editor’s Note: This story was originally published as a Patient Experience Case Study on the Beryl Institute website.

“Case Studies provide real stories of current efforts, including programs being initiated, practices being implemented, and outcomes being targeted and/or achieved. Case studies are presented as both an opportunity for learning from others as well as a spark for further ideas on how we work to improve the patient experience.”

What was the challenge, opportunity or issue faced?

Working with an acute mental health inpatient population, we saw many reasons to introduce photoVOICE here at the North Bay Regional Health Centre. It is powerful in the fight against the stigma that surrounds mental illness, it is empowering to our patients by giving them a voice and it educates everyone it touches from the patient to the policy maker. A photograph goes beyond what words can explain, by sharing the challenges that our patients captured on camera, we were as staff, family and a community more moved to help bring about change! What did you do to address it?

We gave cameras to our inpatients in the Specialized Mental Health Centre and asked them to teach us through pictures and narratives just what recovery from mental illness looks [...] continue the story

Beyond surviving

Published on Oct 22, 2014

At TEDMED, Debra Jarvis draws on her own experience with cancer to offer a witty yet daring look at the way that survivors of disease and trauma can achieve new levels of emotional and psychological healing. For writer, ordained minister, and hospital chaplain Debra Jarvis, humor is a powerful balm. She is not afraid to be funny even when doing very serious work with the sick and dying as a hospice chaplain, a pastoral consultant for volunteer groups caring for people with AIDS and MS, and staff chaplain at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. Debra is the author of It’s Not About the Hair: And Other Certainties of Life & Cancer and numerous other books. Currently on sabbatical in Geneva, Debra’s last job was as writer-in-residence for the University Congregational United Church of Christ in Seattle. In her free time, Debra accompanies her Cairn terrier Max in his therapy dog work.

More from TEDMED 2014

Hello, I am your patient…

We are creating a chapter in my life. You control a large part of this part of my life’s story. For the time being you and I are co-authors of me and of my experience as a patient in your care. Let’s get started.

Any story has the following elements.

1. Setting: You control most of the setting in this story.

Please listen to me. I may not be a nurse or a doctor, but I know how I normally feel. I don’t feel normal, so I came to you. Help me, but please listen to me first.

2. Characters: Obviously you and I have a starring role in this story, but there are many others.

Some I will never meet face to face, but they can control my destiny in this story, just as much as you. I want to believe that the only villain in the story is what is making me sick. I need heroes. I need the kind of hero that takes the time to listen, to ask and to respond quickly and kindly.

3. Conflict: I most certainly have conflict; otherwise, I would not be here. Ironically, as your co-author, I might not fully understand the conflict raging inside me. Norman [...] continue the story

Tig Notaro and Breast Cancer

A message from Louis CK: Tig is a friend of mine and she is very funny.  I love her voice on stage.   One night I was performing at a club in LA called Largo.  Tig was there.   She was about to go on stage.   I hadn’t seen Tig in about a year and I said how are you?   She replied “well I found out today that I have cancer in both breasts and that it has likely spread to my lymph nodes.  My doctor says it looks real bad. “. She wasn’t kidding.  I said “uh.  Jesus.  Tig.  Well. Do you… Have your family… Helping?”. She said “well my mom was with me but a few weeks ago she fell down, hit her head and she died”.  She still wasn’t kidding.

Now, I’m pretty stupid to begin with, and I sure didn’t know what to say now.  I opened my mouth and this came out.  “Jeez, Tig.   I.   Really value you.  Highly.”.  She said “I value you highly too, Louie.”.  Then she held up a wad of note-paper in her hand and said “I’m gonna talk about all of it on stage now.  It’s probably going [...] continue the story