The Nanney/Felts Family: Late-Onset Alzheimer’s Genetics

Looking at the Nanney-Felts family in Tennessee, this film explores the role of genetics in late-onset Alzheimer’s and the quest to find additional genetic risk factors for the disease.

Grandpa, Do You Know Who I Am?

This film tells five stories of children, ages 6-15, who are coping with grandfathers or grandmothers suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. Maria Shriver provides commentary and delivers valuable “lessons” for the kids, urging them not to blame themselves for what their grandparents do or say. “We are all children of Alzheimer’s,” says Shriver, sympathetically making it clear that “if it’s too painful to visit, you don’t have to go.” Maria’s own father, Sargent Shriver, suffers from the disease; comparing his earlier vitality to his present condition is hard, but it is offset by good memories and an unexpected “gift”: bonds between generations that may not have been made otherwise. Ultimately, the film shows how important it is to “go with the flow,” offering up a variety of perspectives on how kids can handle a grandparent’s loss of memory through kindness, patience and compassion

Mixed Cursing: A Graphic Novel on PD

Peter Dunlap-Shohl is an obscure cartoonist who lives far, far away in Anchorage, Alaska.

His diagnosis of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) lead him to create a very personal and open blog. Though “Off & On” started as an information clearinghouse for the Anchorage Parkinson’s Disease Support Group, where meeting schedules, agendas, speakers etc could be found it also become a therapeutic hobby for him.

Recently Peter has taken on the challenge of creating a graphic novel that illustrates his battle with PD. He has graciously allowed Patient Commando to host images of his work as he completes it.

Enjoy!

More Mixed Cursing

In Their Own Words 1 : Allan

Over two decades of living with psoriasis has taught Allan a lot-including the importance of a strong support network.

In Their Own Words 3: Robert

Psoriasis has been Robert’s constant companion for 45 years, and though he has lived his life learning to accept his condition, he is now enjoying life symptom-free.