Finding out about wisdom teeth the hard way

In my 23 years of life, I’ve had health insurance for only 2 of them. Growing up, my Dad made just enough money so that I didn’t qualify for medicaid, but not enough to be able to purchase insurance. Despite this, my parents never denied me needed healthcare, charging everything to our version of health insurance: the credit card. But now, as a young adult watching my parents try to unbury themselves from a mountain of strangling medical debt, I’ve resolved to not let the same fate befall me. My version of health insurance? Do not go to the doctor until I am 99.9% sure I am dying.

This was working fairly well for me until last year. I was relatively healthy most of the time, and was astounded to learn how many things would go away on their own with no antibiotics.

Then, in the fall, a few months after moving to a new town for school, a bad flu knocked me to my feet. And since I had been off my asthma medications for over 4 years due to the prohibitive cost (not of the drugs themselves, which I had been on since I was 6, but of the doctor [...] continue the story

The House of Gort

The House of Gort is the story of a family with two special needs daughters following a medical accident that would forever change their family dynamic.

This piece is lovingly dedicated to my father, Manfred Tatzmann, on his birthday (2012), who has been an advocate for those with special needs and their families my entire life.

Connect with the Gort family here:

Facebook – facebook.com/timgortadadsview Twitter – twitter.com/adadsview

 

No Hockey? No Problem!

By Dave N.

Imagine that you have to tell your young son that he cannot play hockey with his friends. This son may be around nine or ten years old, and his friends have told him that the hockey they play is non-contact. Imagine how hard it would be to tell your son that he cannot play organized hockey, our national past time, because of a medical condition where an awkward fall into the boards or a fall on a shift could be life-threatening.

I have a bleeding disorder known as hemophilia. My blood lacks a certain protein in the clotting process, Factor VIII, and I need to take this replacement factor intravenously whenever I experience internal bleeding. My medical condition does not allow me to play any intensely physical sports like hockey or football.

When I was around ten, one of my good friends told me about the non-contact hockey league he played in, and I tried to convince my parents to enroll me in the coming fall. Both of my parents told me that they did not think it would be a good idea, but, being a ten year old, I pleaded with them to enroll me. “But it’s non-contact!” I [...] continue the story

The World Has Gone Mad

By Michelle Lemme

I’m definitely superstitious.  When I was a child (and even into adulthood) I was, without a doubt, convinced that if I did not say my prayers, and include virtually all of my loved ones AND “all the people in the world who are suffering”, something bad would happen (or at the very least, nothing good would happen) and I would be directly responsible.  Talk about guilt (I could never suffer enough to compare with those caught up in the atrocities taking place all over the world) and anxiety.   Even now, when my sister emails me these crazy “send this to __ people or ___________ will or won’t happen”, I go mental.  I mean WTF, why does she send me these things?  Rationally I know that something happening as a result of not forwarding an email is absurd.  And yet, I am compelled to send those darn things on, just to be on the safe side.  The only way that I can delete these emails, without any risk, is if I don’t actually open them! I should probably mention that avoidance, coping by not having to cope, is one of my fallback behaviors, I have always believed, “ignorance is bliss”.   It’s one of the ways that I manage [...] continue the story

Tony Nicklinson (Locked-in Syndrome) BBC News Part 1

In 2005 Tony Nicklinson had a catastrophic stroke, which has left him utterly paralysed. He has what is known as ‘locked in syndrome’ and cannot move, talk, feed himself or perform even the most basic function without help. He can only communicate via a computer controlled by his eyes.

In this two part series Tony speak with BBC News about wanting to end his life.

About Us

Patient Commando creates social impact by providing platforms that amplify the patient voice.

Read More…

Our Team

Come meet the people who make up our dynamic Team.

Read more…