The Boy Whose Skin Fell Off Part Three

Jonny Kennedy died in 2003 aged 36. He had a terrible genetic condition called Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB) – which meant that his skin literally fell off at the slightest touch, leaving his body covered in agonising sores and leading to a final fight against skin cancer. In his last months Jonny decided to work with filmmaker Patrick Collerton to document his life and death, and the result was a film, first broadcast in March 2004, that was an uplifting, confounding and provocatively humorous story of a singular man.

The Boy Whose Skin Fell Off Part Four

Jonny Kennedy died in 2003 aged 36. He had a terrible genetic condition called Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB) – which meant that his skin literally fell off at the slightest touch, leaving his body covered in agonising sores and leading to a final fight against skin cancer. In his last months Jonny decided to work with filmmaker Patrick Collerton to document his life and death, and the result was a film, first broadcast in March 2004, that was an uplifting, confounding and provocatively humorous story of a singular man.

The Boy Whose Skin Fell Off Part Five

Jonny Kennedy died in 2003 aged 36. He had a terrible genetic condition called Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB) – which meant that his skin literally fell off at the slightest touch, leaving his body covered in agonising sores and leading to a final fight against skin cancer. In his last months Jonny decided to work with filmmaker Patrick Collerton to document his life and death, and the result was a film, first broadcast in March 2004, that was an uplifting, confounding and provocatively humorous story of a singular man.

Pursuing my calling

Ever since I can remember I have been of the mindset that I have been given Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) II Hunter Syndrome for a higher purpose. A gift in many ways. I know it sounds strange to call a genetic progressive (and extremely rare) disease a gift. But that is how I honestly feel. The life I have been given – the experiences, opportunities, people I have met, and friendships I have made (and continue to each and every day) is amazing. I know it’s the person that ultimately creates the life they want to live, but MPS II Hunter Syndrome is part of me. I don’t think I would have had the experiences and live this amazing life if I did not have this painful disease. Of course, MPS II Hunter Syndrome provides many struggles, but to be honest I think the good has outweighed the bad. I am not saying there haven’t been tough days – trust me I have had many and will continue to do so. For those who know me though I don’t live a life where my disease defines me, but rather I believe my disease is just part of me. I truly believe this [...] continue the story