APPENDICITIS I + II: Monday August 25, 2014

I experienced appendicitis twice – which is physically impossible anatomically except in the case of attempting 2 routes of healing. My first choice was to be treated by an intravenous deluge of antibiotics, as it was presented? sold? to me as an effective alternative to an appendectomy, appealed to my greatest fear (the profound invasion and alteration of my body) and, I knew how to repair my constitution following this therapy. Upon recovery, I became consumed with the creation of a document dedicated to the improvement of the patient experience in the area of abdominal conditions and surgeries. Based on my letter, I was invited to present my exhaustive holistic document of RECOMMENDATIONS to select management of the 14th Floor.

Approximately 6 weeks later, I sat in a play and began to experience familiar pain. 19 hours later, I was surrounded by lights and stainless steel, counting down from 10.

There is, in fact, a 3rd route of healing in the facing, and living through, of one’s greatest fear.

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

Mr. Joseph LebovicMount Sinai HospitalJoseph and Wolf Lebovic Health Complex600 University AvenueToronto, ONM5G 1X5August 19, 2011

 

Dear Mr. Lebovic,

I wanted to tell you about my recent experience at Mount Sinai, having landed in an ambulance [...] continue the story

Health Mentor – Season One – Episode 3 – Zal

By: Zal Press

The word “stigma” makes my blood boil.

The session started out with questions about my hospital discharge experiences. For the first 6-8 years of my illness I was in and out of hospital like a revolving door. On discharge I would be visited by a dietician who would give me a standard “low residue” list of foods. Basically stuff to stay away from that would get stuck in my gut and give me an obstruction. The amusing part of this list is that it was the same one year after year and became increasingly blurry as a result of generations of copied copies. I saw this same sheet for almost 20 years.

At some point in the conversation we started on the subject of access and equity of treatment. My medication costs $33,000 a year and I constantly worry about continuing availability of coverage and access to treatment. What will happen to me when I turn 65 in 3.5 years and the Ontario Drug Benefit Plan takes over my medication coverage? Will a debt laden government refuse coverage? Will a bureaucrat decide that it would be cheaper for the system to do surgery than medicate? I worry about those suffering [...] continue the story

Health Mentor – Season One – Episode 3 – Annette

By: Annette McKinnon

I arrived for the final session and had no trouble finding the students. Because of bad weather and flu 2 were missing so the remaining three started with the questions.

This module was about Patient and Client Safety, so in a way, with no hospital stays and discharges I have had it easier than some. We got into a discussion of how the ordinary preventative medicine can be overlooked in a patient with chronic illness when the focus is always on the main problem. Referrals are not always made to associated disciplines either when all of the time is taken up with questions and concerns

In the past I have been one of the patients with a long list of prioritized immediate concerns that I knew there was no chance of getting through.

When we got to a discussion about pain my feeling was that many patients want to hear the health care professional acknowledge that their pain is real. Next they want to have it treated, often with an effective prescription. After that there are other ways to deal with pain that can include a pain clinic, a self management program and educating themselves about their disease. Of course the [...] continue the story

An Account of Frustration with the System

Late last year, at the age of 51, I got sick for the first time ever. My family doctor couldn’t figure out what was wrong with me, so she told me to go to the ER. I resisted this for several weeks because I hadn’t been shot or anything. We should not be delivering primary health care via the ER – it’s much too expensive! After about two months, without any other options offered by my family doctor, I finally realized that if I was going to get any help I had no choice but to present in ER, even though it wasn’t a life threatening situation. I wasn’t even in any pain at that juncture.

I spent about 4 hours in the ER of the hospital where I work (as a social worker) and was treated quickly and with dignity – in no small part because I am on staff. I was told, in so many words, that there aren’t many “perks” in our field, but that when we get sick, we will be cared for. I thought this was a bit unfair towards people who don’t happen to work in a hospital. This was pretty much the end [...] continue the story

About Us

Patient Commando creates social impact by providing platforms that amplify the patient voice.

Read More…

Our Team

Come meet the people who make up our dynamic Team.

Read more…