Through My Eyes

A FILM BY NIC ASKEW. MORE FILMS AT NICASKEW.COM The ability to see through the eyes of another holds the key to empathy. See in its most expansive of definitions. And empathy exists as a quality that might transform the complexion of everything.

Clive’s haunting articulation of a world experienced through the lens of paranoid schizophrenia has led me to understand in a way beyond usual description.

This is part of a Six Film Portrait Series on Schizophrenia made possible by Otsuka and Lundbeck.

More films by Nic Askew

Beyond the Dark

A FILM BY NIC ASKEW. MORE FILMS AT NICASKEW.COM

This Human Portrait in Film is rich beyond gold. A film of hope and light from a seemingly dark and endless place.

It starts as follows;

‘It is like a miracle. I’ve got a son back that I thought I’d lost. We’re probably closer now than we’ve ever been but it did start in a difficult place.’

This film is part of the Schizophrenia Series. Janet’s experience might offer tremendous hope to those in the dark place created by such a rabid condition.

Of course, it can be seen as metaphorical and therefore  might offer a shard of light to anyone in a seemingly dark and unfathomable place.

More films by Nic Askew

Side by Side

A FILM BY NIC ASKEW. MORE FILMS AT NICASKEW.COM

Birgitte was concerned about her ability to express herself fully in the English language. Ironically she might well have articulated the very experience of compassionate care.

In the complex landscape of Schizophrenia, I imagine such care should not be absent. Care that is unconditional. Care that is full of hope and of possibility.

This film portrait is part of a Series on Schizophrenia made possible by Otsuka and Lundbeck.

More films by Nic Askew

Jason Davis

Gang consultant Jason Davis on the impact of violence, on suicide, schizophrenia and bipolar diagnosis.

Why I am an Advocate

By Brandon Staglin August 5, 2010

I have schizophrenia, and sometimes I think about whether I have let my illness define my life. I work for my family’s nonprofit, International Mental Health Research Organization (IMHRO), as a mental health advocate. If you asked me when I was a kid what work I would want to do, the last thing I would have said was to take on a family enterprise. I used to value my individuality above anything else, and dreaded being corrupted by conformity. Thanks in part to my illness, my values have shifted since then. I had a psychotic break in 1990, the summer after my freshman year at Dartmouth College. A friend managed to get me to a psychiatry ward. At first, I could not accept that I had a mental illness. I had a life plan, to be an astronautical engineer! I would not be cut down by a schizophrenia diagnosis.

Three nights into my first hospitalization I decided I would get out of the psych ward immediately. I was unable to sleep, furious, and refused to take meds. A nurse was on her way with an injection to make me sleep. I would not let her violate my consciousness! [...] continue the story