Change and The Close Sisters

Glenn Close, the founder of http://BringChange2Mind.org, tells the very personal story of how mental illness affected her family. Visit http://BringChange2Mind.org for more information on how you can help combat the stigma around mental health.

October 21, 2009

Robbie’s Story

It has been a love-hate relationship with sugar that has defined Robbie McCauley’s experience with diabetes. But it has been Sugar in another form that has helped her towards healing.

Robbie McCauley, Professor of Performing Arts at Emerson College in Boston, has achieved a career that many would envy. She has filled the roles of performance artist, playwright, director, and educator. Her award-winning work in the theater has been acclaimed as groundbreaking in its unabashed confrontation of issues of race and class during a time when these topics were simply not discussed.

“But even in the midst of all of that,” says Robbie, “the one thing I was not going to acknowledge was my own silence about [my] diabetes. And of course we’re silent about it. No one ever asks, and we all know the shame and blame that can come with it. But one has to speak at some point.”

Growing up, Robbie’s mother always prepared healthy meals, and the family rarely ate junk food or even had dessert. “But I craved candy bars all the time during junior high,” she remembers. “I was sneaking candy, and eating mounds of peanut butter and grape jelly sandwiches on Wonder bread, and what did [...] continue the story

Schwartz Center Compassionate Caregiver of the Year Dr. Amy Ship

In accepting the award, Ship spoke of the importance of small gestures in the doctor-patient relationship – specifically, the art of listening with both eyes and ears. “Returning the (patient’s) gaze is one of those powerful small gestures,” she said. “It encapsulates empathy and compassion – being present, fully present, to another human being: pausing to look back. To say with our eyes that we are listening, that we hear.”

It’s a lesson she teaches medical students who rotate through Healthcare Associates. “I’m proud to be a primary care doctor,” she said. “Primary care is focused on continuity, of knowing one’s patients through all their illnesses and the complexity of their lives. And primary care is focused on prevention – on protecting you from the consequences of untreated but silent diseases and from unnecessary tests or hospitalization. That’s care we all need and deserve.

“I look out tonight at a room filled with people who have the minds, energy and position to change medicine, and I want to make it clear that primary care needs saving. Those who practice it need to be given the time to do it right. Primary care can literally save lives, but it can not be done [...] continue the story

Dancing With Parkinson’s

Dancing with Parkinson’s open house for friends and family December 2010.

 

Janice Dean Speaks on Living with Multiple Sclerosis

Janice Dean goes public with her MS on Fox & Friends.

March 9, 2008