What GPs can learn by listening to patients | The Gaurdian

I was nervous at first and wasn’t sure what to expect. I write this having just come back from our first patient participation group (PPG) meeting. After this inaugural face-to-face, I came home feeling that the disparate group of our patients who made an effort to give up their time were generally pleased that they had attended.

I was really glad to meet them all outside the consulting room yet still on practice turf, managing to listen to their views. And in return I gave them some insight into the workings of their local surgery as well as a whistlestop tour.

Every patient who attended had two things in common – health needs and being registered at our practice. It’s only right that they get to voice their opinions, and that we as a practice can adapt to their needs and provide them with an even better service.

The government has encouraged practices to form such groups as part of a DES, or directed enhanced service. These are – in theory – optional initiatives which reward practices in return for work that improves the quality of patient care.

The themes which came up were no surprise. Access featured heavily. What is the best way [...] continue the story

“Listening to the Patient Voice” – a Planetree story

I’ve long been surprised that Planetree.org is not better known by everyone who talks about patient-centered care, patient engagement, etc. I attended one of their webcasts in April and wrote about a great booklet they discussed.

I’m taking the liberty of pasting in here an item from their latest e-newsletter, because it illustrates how they think and how things unfold as a result. __________

Listening to the Patient Voice How It’s Done at Platte Valley Medical Center

Including patients and families in the development of a truly patient-centered care experience formally took shape at Platte Valley Medical Center in 2008 with the formation of the hospital’s community focus group. Staff from clinical and non-clinical departments volunteer and are trained to participate in an interactive process to listen and respond to patients’ feedback through quarterly care-centered interviews. To date, we have completed eight sessions. Testimonies are then used to assist with critical problem solving, program development, and measure successes. Concrete action steps, developed with the patient and family, are used for house-wide staff training. Through a video presentation and newsletter, entitled The Patients’ Voice, hospital staff is invited to “Munch and Learn” sessions to hear patients’ stories and apply what they learn to their daily work.

Lessons Learned from our [...] continue the story