Patient feedback provides focal point for future of care at KGH

It cannot be denied that Kingston General Hospital has received some less-than-favourable feedback over the years. Now, hospital officials are looking to connect with the public in order to better understand the needs of patients and ultimately implement programs and practices that will be as effective as possible.

On the evening of Nov. 10, KGH held a public event called Patients Know Best, which saw members from the hospital’s Patient Advisory Council, formed in February of 2010, speak about their own experiences at the hospital and how they are helping to shape the future of care delivered there.

“Input from patients is critical to how we make improvements in hospital settings and for the whole experience of patients,” said KGH Vice President for Clinical Administration and Professional Practice and Chief Nursing Officer Eleanor Rivoire.

Advisor Lidia Dorosz gave a heart-felt account of what it was like to witness her mother be neglected, often to the point of abuse, by nursing staff at the hospital as she lived her final days.

“I am a council member because I want to make a difference,” she said. “I want to hold people accountable…it’s time that we (are able) to feel safe about going to KGH.”

Overall, Dorosz said [...] continue the story

Social Media & Patient Centric Care

Michael Evans, Director and Staff Physician at St. Michael’s Hospital talks about social media and patient-centred care. This interview was conducted by The Change Foundation during their Meeting of the Minds 2011 Conference: How to ACE the Patient Experience. The Change Foundation is an independent policy think tank, intent on changing the health-care debate, health-care practice and the health-care experience in Ontario.

Video is also available on the Change Foundation website here.

Cancer patients, survivors find truth in ’50/50′ | LA Times

In the new film “50/50,” there is a scene where cancer patient Adam, played by Joseph Gordon-Levitt, is on a gurney being wheeled into the operating room with his parents by his side. As the nurses take the 27-year-old away, he calls out for his mom like he’s a little boy. It’s an affecting moment, but for Matthew Zachary, it was particularly personal.

“That’s exactly what happened to me,” said the 37-year-old father of twins from New York City who was diagnosed withbrain cancer at age 21. “Literally I’m with my parents and they are wheeling me off to the operating room and I lost it. It was a horrible, horrible experience.”

For Heidi Adams, it was the scene at the dinner table between Gordon-Levitt’s character and his mother, played by Anjelica Huston, who wants to move in to help care for him.

“I remember that conversation with my mother, that struggle at that time in your life when you are discovering your independence, fighting for your independence and you are thrown back into this position where you need to rely on people, where you need your mom. It’s very disorienting,” said Adams, 44, from Austin, Texas, who lived with her parents for 2 1/2 years when [...] continue the story

Kathy Kastner: Thinking, Talking, Asking

Our good friend Kathy Kastner over at Ability4life.com has been trying to make sense out of doctor/patient communication for a long time. How often do people not take medication properly because they don’t understand the instructions? How often do patients simply forget what a doctor has said because they can’t listen as fast as a doctor can talk? Imagine how important sensitivity to communications needs to be when a highly educated doctor speaks to adults with 8th grade literacy, or immigrants with limited English, or seniors with failing memories, or teenagers with bursting libidos. Kathy’s been busy producing a series of videos and she describes the objectives in her own words: In between doctor’s appointments, we patients live our lives, and a ‘one size fits all’ rarely applies to daily health regimes. It’s in our own best interest to ensure we’ve negotiated a schedule we can follow. With my ‘think about it, talk about it, ask about it’ campaign I use real life examples to help kick start that process.

View Kathy’s Youtube Channel here http://www.youtube.com/user/kathykastner

Tweet #MyPS and Share Your Patient Story

#MyPS is “My Patient Story” on Twitter. And Patient Commando will share it.

Patient Commando is embarking on a mission to start something different. If you use Twitter, we want you to share your patient story. #MyPS – My Patient Story, is a way to surface the patient experience in 140 characters or less.

#MyPS tweets can be about anything related to the patient experience; An experience at the hospital, how you manage your medication, or even how you’re coping with a disease. Whether your a patient, caregiver or practitioner we want you to share with us and our growing community.

An Example:

Just add #MyPS to the tweets you want to share and Patient Commando will do the rest. Using Twitter, Facebook and a soon to launch website, Patient Commando will shine a light on your experience.

We aim to create a healthcare community supported, educated and inspired by the patient experience.  Your voice is the key.