A Donation to SickKids Foundation

On May 12, Cancer Can’t Dance Like This, presented by Patient Commando, played to a sold out audience at CBC’s Glenn Gould Studio in Toronto.

The evening’s production was hosted for Lilah’s Fund – a fund that supports research into neuroblastoma, a cancer that mainly affects children under 5 years of age.

Last week the star of the Cancer Can’t Dance Like This, Daniel Stolfi and Patient Commando’s Executive Director Zal Press, gave a significant donation to SickKids Foundation on behalf of Lilah’s Fund.  A $5,000 check was presented to Dr. David Kaplan, Senior Scientist and head of Cancer Research at The Hospital for Sick Children.

Our sincere thanks to all of those who came out and supported our inaugural event.  We look forward to hosting many more productions and continuing our work in patient storytelling and education.

For information on Patient Commando feature presentations, speakers bureau and workshops please email info@patientcommando.com

Michaela Cornell Writes About Patient Commando

Here at Patient Commando we work with talented, fun and hardworking individuals. More impressive is that these people regularly and happily share their experiences of working with us.  Two weeks ago we shared Jillian’s blog with you. Today we share a recent post by Michaela Cornell.

Michaela operates Michaela Cornell Publishers in Toronto and has been working with clients like Perseus Books Group, Random House of Canada, HarperCollins Canada and Penguin Canada for several years. Recently she began working with the Patients Association of Canada and now Patient Commando.

We invite you to read Michaela’s post on working with Zal, Patient Commando and our last production, Cancer Can’t Dance Like This.

http://mcpublishers.wordpress.com/2011/05/13/patient-commando-cancer-cant-dance-like-this/

Patient Commando’s debut play hits close to home for Zal Press | National Post

When Zal Press was 29 years old, he went to the hospital with a pain in his gut that felt like he had “a cat trapped in [his] stomach trying to claw its way out.

“A doctor came up to me as I was lying in the hospital and he says to me, ‘Mr. Press, you have a serious illness. You have Crohn’s disease,’ ” Press recalls. “I couldn’t even spell Crohn’s, I had never heard of it. All I wanted was a pill so I could get on with my life.”

Thirty years later, Press has moved on with his life, but he certainly hasn’t forgotten about Crohn’s. About two years ago, he set off on a journey to try and get involved in changing the Canadian health-care system and the way patients perceive chronic illness.

“I became attracted to patient advocacy and patient empowerment and this whole new movement of this educated, informed, Internet-aware patient who’s engaged in their own health care,” he says.

Last year, after giving up a successful art business, Press started Patient Commando, a theatre production company that uses storytelling and humour to empower patients. The company’s debut production is a performance of Cancer Can’t Dance Like This, [...] continue the story