Patient Commando’s Survival Guide Now Available.

We are proud to release Patient Commando’s Survival Guide: How to Survive and Thrive During Hospital Stays and Long-Term Care.

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An excerpt from our Survival Guide:

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Patient Commando attends Health Council of Canada’s National Symposium on Patient Engagement

During the Health Council of Canada Symposium on Patient Engagement Daniel Stolfi, star of Cancer Can’t Dance Like This, disclosed that his tipping point to becoming an engaged patient, came when he was being over medicated in error and suffering bad side effects but no healthcare providers were listening.

Healthcare leaders across the country came together to learn how to improve patient engagement and increase safety and improve outcomes at the Allstream centre in Toronto.

Daniel presented his patient story to inform the system on how to improve communications between doctors and patients and increase the state of collaboration. His presentation was funny, deeply personal and moving. The crowd was animated and laughing.

A report of the symposium is promised to be released this winter.

Be sure to sign up for Patient Commando’s newsletter for updates and to receive a free copy of our white paper:  On a New Frontier of Patient Engagement.

Patient Commando’s reaction to the movie “50/50”

Thanks to Entertainment One Group, Patient Commando received several passes to their latest release 50/50.

We quickly offered the passes through Facebook and Twitter until they were all gone. Yesterday we received the following from fellow Patient Commando, Sean McDermott on his reaction to the film: Today, my daughter Kate and I went to see the movie 50/50. It features a lot of laughter and a heap of Seth Rogans colourful language and pot smoking ways, if you like that…and we did. The movie is a poignant examination of the manner in which family and friends react to chronic/terminal illness. Sometimes I wonder how Kate copes with all this challenge of me, her Dad having an endstage disease On the way out I was thinking how many moments I could relate to, and Kate said to me “that was a good movie for you and I to see together”. I smiled and was grateful for her love and support.” Thank you again to Entertainment One for the opportunity to share this film with our community.

Social Media & Patient Centric Care

Michael Evans, Director and Staff Physician at St. Michael’s Hospital talks about social media and patient-centred care. This interview was conducted by The Change Foundation during their Meeting of the Minds 2011 Conference: How to ACE the Patient Experience. The Change Foundation is an independent policy think tank, intent on changing the health-care debate, health-care practice and the health-care experience in Ontario.

Video is also available on the Change Foundation website here.

“How to Live Before You Die.”

In his 2005 address to the Stanford University graduating class he told them that “death is life’s change agent.” Yesterday, the man who was one of the leaders of the information revolution and permanently changed the way our society shares and communicates information, left this world silent of the end-of-life experience.

He gave us tools to help us elevate ourselves beyond our own expectations of what defines us.  Yet at the end of his life, only a simple statement back on August 24 shared little.

It brings up the issue how even the most innovative of us are still trapped by society’s taboos, by topics that we haven’t got the courage, understanding, or education to talk about comfortably.

Whether its end-of-life or chronic illness, the notion of sickness is something we still don’t have an open dialogue about. People whose bodies are suffering are stigmatized by their conditions. And public behaviour ends up marginalizing the individual.

It would have been interesting, no doubt, had Steve Jobs shared with us, even a minute portion of his experience with illness and impending death. How liberating might it have been if among all the billions of accolades that are coming out today, there would be one that [...] continue the story