Patient Commando’s reaction to the movie “50/50”

Thanks to Entertainment One Group, Patient Commando received several passes to their latest release 50/50.

We quickly offered the passes through Facebook and Twitter until they were all gone. Yesterday we received the following from fellow Patient Commando, Sean McDermott on his reaction to the film: Today, my daughter Kate and I went to see the movie 50/50. It features a lot of laughter and a heap of Seth Rogans colourful language and pot smoking ways, if you like that…and we did. The movie is a poignant examination of the manner in which family and friends react to chronic/terminal illness. Sometimes I wonder how Kate copes with all this challenge of me, her Dad having an endstage disease On the way out I was thinking how many moments I could relate to, and Kate said to me “that was a good movie for you and I to see together”. I smiled and was grateful for her love and support.” Thank you again to Entertainment One for the opportunity to share this film with our community.

Social Media & Patient Centric Care

Michael Evans, Director and Staff Physician at St. Michael’s Hospital talks about social media and patient-centred care. This interview was conducted by The Change Foundation during their Meeting of the Minds 2011 Conference: How to ACE the Patient Experience. The Change Foundation is an independent policy think tank, intent on changing the health-care debate, health-care practice and the health-care experience in Ontario.

Video is also available on the Change Foundation website here.

Closing the Door on Cycle 4 2011

Last time, the Cycle 4 Team and I were continuing our journey across Canada –remaining kilometers: 1500, Toronto to Digby. We had already completed roughly 5500 from British Columbia. So no sweat, right?

Well, no. There was sweat. Plenty of it. Half of the reason cyclists always wear glasses is to avoid rain, bugs or dirt in their eyes. The other half is to avoid sweat splashing from the rider in front of them.

No matter the amount of perspiration, the next few hundred kilometers would be extremely special for me. I was fortunate enough to bike through my hometown in Toronto’s east end, and enjoy seeing all the places that have meaning to me; my grandparents’ street, the Tim Horton’s where I usually meet friends, the mall where I had my first job.

My second “hometown” of Kingston, where I spend more than half the year as a student at Queen’s was also one of our stops. To see my friends and family welcoming me home, in both cities, just spurred me on to pedal faster and harder for the last few legs of our ride into Quebec, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia.

I can firmly say that no other region in the [...] continue the story

“Listening to the Patient Voice” – a Planetree story

I’ve long been surprised that Planetree.org is not better known by everyone who talks about patient-centered care, patient engagement, etc. I attended one of their webcasts in April and wrote about a great booklet they discussed.

I’m taking the liberty of pasting in here an item from their latest e-newsletter, because it illustrates how they think and how things unfold as a result. __________

Listening to the Patient Voice How It’s Done at Platte Valley Medical Center

Including patients and families in the development of a truly patient-centered care experience formally took shape at Platte Valley Medical Center in 2008 with the formation of the hospital’s community focus group. Staff from clinical and non-clinical departments volunteer and are trained to participate in an interactive process to listen and respond to patients’ feedback through quarterly care-centered interviews. To date, we have completed eight sessions. Testimonies are then used to assist with critical problem solving, program development, and measure successes. Concrete action steps, developed with the patient and family, are used for house-wide staff training. Through a video presentation and newsletter, entitled The Patients’ Voice, hospital staff is invited to “Munch and Learn” sessions to hear patients’ stories and apply what they learn to their daily work.

Lessons Learned from our [...] continue the story

Cross-Country Check In with Cycle4: National Relay

In an earlier blog post we introduced the C4WM: National Relay and Team Cyclebetes rider Aryssah Stankevitsch.

Aryssah had just embarked on a cross-country journey to raise $15,000 for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.  Having been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes only 2 years earlier, a long-distance athletic event was a formidable undertaking. It took the Relay just 13 days to reach Toronto from Vancouver for a mid-point media event. Here we were finally able to meet Aryssah face-to-face to find out what drove her to spend a month in the saddle, to raise money, and speak out about her experience as a diabetic.

“I want to be worth imitating.  I believe that with any sort of ailment that you’ve had, you can fight a battle a lot harder when you’re going uphill than when you’re on flat terrain.”

Pat Com: How long have you been a Diabetic? Aryssah: I was diagnosed when I was 19. I’m 21 now so I’ve been living with it for 2 years. I had been hypoglycemic before (which means low blood sugars), so I would load up on sugars before I did athletic activities. I guess my doctor didn’t take it as a warning sign of diabetes as no one else [...] continue the story

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Patient Commando creates social impact by providing platforms that amplify the patient voice.

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