Am I addicted?

Posted on December 2, 2013

Since being diagnosed over 6 years ago I have become very blasé about “popping” pills. There have been times in my treatment when I have been taking 12 pills before I had even had my morning wash. I guess I tried to be as ignorant as possible to what I was taking in a blind hope that they would offer some relief from my Crohn’s Disease symptoms. No matter what my ailment, there always seemed to be an extra pill that could be taken.

Even now that I am more educated to what the medications do and how they work, it doesn’t stop me dropping a pill a soon as something doesn’t feel quite right.

If I feel nauseous I take a pill, if I get a headache I take a pill and if my tummy shows any sign of not being in any way cooperative then I will take a pill.

It is not until you make a conscious effort to monitor or restrict the amount of medication you take that you begin to notice just the quantity of medication you are reliant on.

Alongside my Mercaptopurine I was regularly taking a dose of Imodium and paracetamol. It had [...] continue the story

Letter From the Editor of Recovery Wire Magazine

I entered into recovery as a teenager. I recall the nurses giving me an evening pass from the detox centre to go see the Lion King on my 19th birthday. From there I moved into a halfway house with other female addicts. I did my best to fit in. I was a very “low bottom” so they told me. I had a really hard time that first year. I had no idea how to connect to people, especially other women. I kept to myself mostly. I couldn’t carry on conversations all that well, and my outside appearance matched my insides perfectly. My entire wardrobe, make-up collection and hair accessories consisted of nothing but black, and I powdered my skin an even lighter shade of white to accentuate my expiry date. Those were indeed different times.

One morning, as part of my rehabilitation, I had to get on a bus at 7:00 am and head to a 12-step meeting in another part of the city. I remember it was a cold morning. I had about six months clean, and there was a frost on the ground. As I waited for the bus I became more and more intolerant, but a new voice was beginning to immerge. The voice of reason and sanity, a quiet voice at the time, but she [...] continue the story

Ottawa Inner City Health – Saving An Artist From Creative Silence

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Photography: Roger Lemoyne

When Dr. Jeff Turnbull found Normee Ekoomiak sleeping under a bridge, the author and textile artist was close to death. Now he’s back to wielding needle and thread and is well enough to leave a hospice program.

For more information on Ottawa Inner City Health:

Website: http://ottawainnercityhealth.ca/Home

Address: 5 Myrand Avenue, Ottawa, ON K1N 5N7

Phone: 613 562-4500 | Fax: 613 562-4505

More Frontline Health Stories

Doctors Of The World In Canada – Filling The Gaps In Montreal’s Inner City

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Photography: Roger Lemoyne

For more than 20 years Médecins du Monde has been providing medical care to refugees, street children and displaced persons around the world: people living in the midst of armed conflicts and victims of natural disasters, famines and epidemics. Photojournalist Roger Lemoyne has been covering international issues for more than a decade and has worked alongside Médecins du Monde in such places as Kosovo and Haiti. He was very surprised to hear Médecins du Monde was also providing care in his hometown of Montreal. He spent a day on the street with one of their nurses.

For more information on Médecins du Monde Canada visit: Website:

http://www.medecinsdumonde.ca

Address: 338 rue Sherbrooke Est Montreal, QB H2X 1E6

Phone: 1-514-281-8998

More Frontline Health Stories

How Did I Quit Smoking? I Just Stopped!

By Sean McDermott

I had quit smoking so many times that I decided not to use that word ever again and now when I hear people say that they have “quit”,  I take it lightly and reserve comment.  Quitting is something that you fear, something that you approach slowly and have a plan in place to overcome the odds, the mood swings, the cravings.  I had no such thing.

Let me give you some untypical background.  In July of 2007 I arrived at Toronto Western Hospital in an ambulance dying of Liver Disease from Alcoholism.  I know this because they told me next morning that I had been dying for about two weeks. I wouldn’t have made it through the night if my sister and Mother had not insisted as I lay in my sweat-drenched Queen bed, throwing up repeatedly, that I had to go to hospital.  Even then I kept thinking,  “if I could just rest” but I went as they say, kicking and screaming.  The Chief Physician the very next morning visited my bedside, told me that I was very lucky and that my life was about to change, that is if I wanted to live.  There is always the [...] continue the story

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