Choosing what to wear with an ostomy.

April 12, 2014

Personally, I love fashion & clothes and always have done even before my surgery.

Before I had my surgery, I was always worried that it would restrict what I wear but I have not really had to change anything to accommodate having a stoma. I’ve found that the only thing I have had to change is to not wear really tight fitting things like skintight bodycon dresses as it doesn’t leave my stoma enough room to work and increases the chances of leaks greatly. I find that I can still wear close fitting things though, and wear a stoma waistband or a stoma vest underneath tighter fitting garments to help minimise my bag being recognisable through the garment.

Some clothing tips I find work for me having an ostomy are:

Wearing ‘stomawear’ such as a stoma waistband or a stoma vest. I wear the Comfizz waistband most days as a lot of the things I wear are quite close fit, such as skinny jeans/jeggings and tighter tops. (Just type ‘Comfizz’ into google for these). Vanilla Blush also do great stoma underwear (I love the pretty high-waisted knickers!). Also, a lot of ostomates in the UK should be able to claim a [...] continue the story

Life with an Ileostomy: Celebrating 6 Years!

By Leah Sannar

Ahh, don’t you just love exploring the lighter side of life with an ostomy? Anyway – guess what? This month marks my 6th “Ostoversary.” In case you’re new to this fabulous term, which I know you are because I just made it up, it’s a combo – Ostomy/Anniversary. This is a big deal you guys! I can’t believe time goes by so quickly and that I’m already celebrating 6 years! And I do use the term “celebrating” on purpose, because that’s exactly what I’m doing. I’m celebrating. Sure, living with an Ileostomy has had its challenges. And they are definitely challenging; I don’t mean to downplay them. But when you put those trials next to the ones I faced with active Crohn’s Disease – they feel mild, even easy. Maybe not in the moment… but they are 100% more desirable to me, than going back to life without an Ostomy. (Hear more about how I ended up with an Ileostomy here.)

People are always so fascinated with me when they find out about my Ileostomy. I always get this blank stare that says, “Oh man, I have so many questions… I really want to ask, but I don’t want to offend [...] continue the story

Gut Inspired: Rob on being an advocate

Published on Apr 18, 2012 by GutInspired

Rob Hill is a member of Gut Inspired, living with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD; Crohn’s Disease). He is sharing more about his experiences advocating for himself and others as well as actively managing his disease with his health care team. Rob knows the importance of communication and can better manage his symptoms because works together with specialists he trusts. Rob Hill works with the Intestinal Disease, Education and Awareness Society (IDEAS) raising awareness and sharing his experiences through Gut Inspired.

Please share this video with others who may live with IBD and encourage them to talk and learn more about their disease. To learn more about Gut Inspired and Rob’s story, please visit www.facebook.com/gutinspired

Rob Hill Climbs Mountains

In 1994, Rob was a fit, healthy 23-year-old, an amateur runner and athlete. Until that time, he had never really been sick. He didn’t even have a regular doctor. When the illness started, it progressed rapidly. Daily diarrhea. Sustained stomach cramps. The diagnosis was Crohn’s disease, an inflammatory condition of the digestive tract. It got worse, and his weight plummeted from 185 to 105 pounds. After a year and a half, it became clear that his large intestine, his colon, needed to be removed.

Not long after surgery, Rob started getting active again, running and eventually competing. In his lowest moment, he had not been able to climb the stairs in his house so regaining his fitness became a very personal challenge. Recovering mentally would take longer.

When Rob was ill, he learned an aunt of his also had Crohn’s, a fact she had never shared, even with close family members. Through her experience, and his own, Rob realized how destructive the stigma surrounding intestinal diseases and having an ostomy can be. How it can isolate you, keep you from reaching out and getting help. Rob decided he had to do something about it.

The Seven Summits campaign, which we call “No Guts [...] continue the story