Suddenly, Cancer is the funniest joke in NYC

So who says you can’t laugh at Cancer?

This past week, the audio recording of Tig Notaro’s comedy stand-up routine about her breast cancer diagnosis last summer turned up on Louis CK’s site for a $5 download. Here’s an excerpt of Louis’ reaction: The show was an amazing example of what comedy can be. A way to visit your worst fears and laugh at them. Tig took us to a scary place and made us laugh there. Not by distracting us from the terror but by looking right at it and just turning to us and saying “wow. Right?”. She proved that everything is funny. And has to be. And she could only do this by giving us her own death as an example. So generous.

Now New York City is about to turn Cancer into the funniest joke in town. First off-Broadway and then Columbia University will celebrate the art of laughing at cancer.

On October 19, the 2011 Canadian Comedy Award winner for Best One Person Show headlines the prestigious United Solo Theatre Festival just off-Broadway. Daniel Stolfi turns his tussle with non-Hodgkins Lymphoma at the age of 25 into a tour de force of dramatizations, characterizations, humiliations and exhilarations. He takes [...] continue the story

Production Company Blends Live Theatre With Patient Experience | HIROC News

A new Canadian entertainment production company is blending live theatre with the patient experience, in hopes of highlighting the importance of engaging patients in their healthcare.

Patient Commando’s debut production, Cancer Can’t Dance Like This, is May 12 in Toronto at the Glenn Gould Studio, CBC Broadcast Centre, 250 Front St. W.

Zal Press, Patient Commando founder, has had Crohn’s disease for 30 years and recently sold his business to start the company. Press plans to take the productions across the country to give patients, families and health providers the opportunity to look at illness and the patient experience from a fresh perspective.

“It’s not just a story for patients,” Press tells Axiom News.

“It is about experiencing and understanding (the patient perspective) through new eyes.”

Patient Commando uses public speaking, humour therapy workshops and live theatre to present compelling stories from the patient perspective. Cancer Can’t Dance Like This is a one-man show and comedic dramatization of Daniel Stolfi’s two-year battle with cancer.

Press hopes healthcare providers attend and learn more about the patient narrative.

“By making them open to the patient experience would be a voice to guide practice change. It’s instructive. It helps create a culture of safety.”

Proceeds from Patient Commando’s feature stage events [...] continue the story

Patient Commando proves laughter the best medicine | InsideToronto.com

Did you hear the one about the young guy with cancer?

How about the punchline about the middle-aged man battling Crohn’s disease for the last three decades?

Obviously, there is nothing funny about being diagnosed with a life-threatening or debilitating illness.

But people often encounter humour as they navigate their health care journeys, including sharing a camaraderie among other patients. And research has shown laughter really can be the best medicine.

Now, North York resident Zal Press is giving a voice to sick people through his new entertainment company called Patient Commando.

“Patient Commando uses public speaking, humour therapy workshops and live theatre to present compelling stories from the patient perspective,” a statement about the company said.

“It is the first initiative of its kind in Canada, producing ‘patient storytelling entertainment’ to create an environment of understanding – most often through the use of humour.”

Live performances, which raise money for charities, are one-man shows featuring patients using a combination of comedy and the real-life heartbreak of facing a serious illness to tell their stories.

Patient Commando’s inaugural production was held Thursday, May 12 at Toronto’s Glenn Gould Studio.

It featured Bloor West Village comedian, actor and cancer survivor Daniel Stolfi performing Cancer Can’t Dance Like This. The performance [...] continue the story